Tristan Burke: T-Cat Design

Tristan Burke, 21 years old of Umass Amherst is a shredder! Riding for Lifelong Longboards, Team Mids, Eden Racing, and perpetually down with all things East Coast, this dude can skate. Aside from skating, Tristan has always had a love for art as well and this has led to his new project called: T-Cat Designs. His artwork is made using low-grade markers and he describes it as “a cluster f*ck of colors”.

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“I first got into this kind of stuff through prototyping decks for LifeLong. Wether a given deck had a graphic screened on it or not, there was plenty of untouched wood grain. At first I just colored on a few decks for myself and the fun of it, but everyone’s reactions to what I considered doodles really blew me away.”

Tristan has recently been creating custom board graphics for Eden Racing and plans for his artwork to be featured on the not-yet-released Mids Lids are also in the works. Tristan is now taking your requests to draw rad as f*ck sharpie designs on your deck, full face, t-shirt, instruments, pets and anything else you can think of.

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For all artistic inquires, please contact Tristan here on his Facebook page. T-Cat Design aims to help sustain his skateboarding addiction, and all profits are going towards funding a skate trip for this summer.

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“Eden Racing’s initial support of my designs was what really pushed me to take this a little more seriously and try and get my designs out there as much as I can. I really enjoy it, saw that I could make a bit of money from it, and saw the opportunity to combine skateboarding and coloring, which are the two things I actually give a shit about these days”.

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If you like these graphics don’t hesitate to get yours custom!

This California Republic flag is for sale!! BUY DIS NOOW!

How to get a custom graphic from Tristan??

  •  Like “T-Cat Design” on Facebook
  • Message T-Cat Design with an idea of what you’re looking for in a graphic and agree on a price.
  • Ship your gear to Tristan with the cash; Tristan will pay for shipping on the way back to you.
  • Enjoy some gnarly custom artwork going to support a super chill skater

Again, for all artistic inquires, please contact Tristan here on his Facebook page. Also make sure to head over and like the Team Mids Facebook page and stay up to date with the rest of the Team Mids crew.

skate the east tank

The Goose: The Rad Dad

Rad Dad’s live among us. They created us, raised us, and have supported us through good and bad times. For some of the young shredders, your rad dad may even take you to events, help pay for gear, drive you to local sessions, and even hops on board here and there to prove he’s still got it from back in his day. Not all of us have the pleasure of having a rad dad; but hopefully many of you do. My dad is extremely rad and if you would like some proof look no further than this video:

Within the past year and a half I’ve had the pleasure of getting to know Quentin LaChance and his Rad Dad Goosen or as many of us call him “the Goose”. I first met them at a freeride session in Providence, Rhode Island. Nowadays I often meet up with them in Portsmouth with the URI dudes for some really gnarly sessions.

Goose the Rad Dad

The Goose getting gnarly

Quentin is 14 and shreds harder and goes bigger every time I see him. He’s always having a good time and I anticipate awesome things for him in 2014. LaChance is from Mass., where he is currently attending middle school as an eighth grader. He started skating about two years ago and has since become a well-respected member of the east coast longboarding community. He has recently built his own longboard with the help of Stephan Vaast of Arson Longboards. When he is not skating he is painting during the long winter months but is super stoked to get out skating again this spring.

Quentin poking out a toeside

Quentin poking out a toeside

Quentin rides for Team Pup n’ Suds which vibes a carefree attitude.  Having fun, skating to impress yourself and getting to the level you want to be at is the name of the game here.

Peep this summer edit of Pup N Suds:

“The raddest dad and most down to earth grom around” said Chris Rideout, Rhode Island homie and frequent host of the CT Wheelabrator event.

Quentin and the Goose are as stoked as they come about downhill skateboarding. These two with out a doubt have become a growing part of the east coast community. Having attended major east coast events such as Longboard for Life in North Andover Mass., Central Mass in Harvard and Wheelabrator in CT, these guys continue to hit rad sessions all over the New England area and are of course stoked for what the 2014 season has to offer.

Goose and the hound pose for a picture on puddling stone

Goose and the hound pose for a picture on puddling stone

Goose the dad is rad, just ask homeless Eric of Nelson Longboards “Goosen is the way, heed his words carefully.”

“Organized sports for our children have changed drastically these days, everyone wins a trophy and that sends the wrong message, that it doesn’t matter what effort you put in because at the end of the day everyone’s still a winner. In real life it’s not like that and when I grew up there was a competitive push to work hard to become better. The favoritism and politics involved in organized youth sports allows the coach’s son to become the quarter back, or allow for unfair amounts of playing time, these sports are often run by parents trying to find profit.

Skaters compete against themselves, reaching for their personal best. This has allowed kids to spend the day outside and put as little or as much effort into it as they would like. This sport is purely for fun, and the rider decides how seriously they would like to take it. They are their own coach and set their own goals. The community is extremely friendly. Skaters of all skill level skate together in peace and are always supportive of one and other. The most experienced riders are always there to encourage and support the less experienced, they promote progression, and don’t put others down. Skaters find achievement based on how well they feel after each run, and how their buddies react to the fat stand up you just threw down in front of them. This sport is a great hobby for my son, and I am happy to be apart of it. I believe there should be more father’s getting involved in the sport and recognize the positive attributes that skateboarding has to offer.”

If you are an east coast shredder it won’t be long before you meet the Goose. He is super stoked on the sport and can often be found filming the session on his GoPro, or giving rides back up the hill in his pick up truck. The Goose will hop on board occasionally but he’s really there to have a good time with everyone and watch the fun happen. Aside from being involved the in the skate scene, you can find him tending to his chickens, working on his garden, goofing around with his pet hound, out fishing, or picking his guitar.

Follow the Goose on his Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/thegoosenspage

Goosen tending to his chickens living in his homemade coop

Goosen tending to his chickens living in his homemade coop

“After becoming involved with this community through my son, and after spending much of my time in organized sports with my older sons, I believe that the kids involved in longboarding are ahead of the curve for what it means to be truly alive and experience life to its full potential. They get out doors, stay healthy with exercise, and really appreciate sharing the camaraderie with their fellow man.”

 

Video and Interview: John Kreutter

John Kreutter Boneless

John Kreutter is probably one of the biggest names on east coast downhill scene at the mere age of 16. One may call it big fish small pond but I just call it like I see it. We were able to catch John on the book of faces for a quick little  chit chat about his new video, the winter, and the future.

John Kreutter, Kai Monroe, Liam Morgan

(Right to left) John Kreutter, Kai Monroe, and Liam Morgan

Connor: Alright so about the video, when did you shoot it and how long did it take to film?
JK: We filmed the video about 3 months ago before winter started up. It took us 2 days to film

Connor: Nice nice. Speaking of winter, what have you been up to since all this snow can restrict when and where you can skate?

JK: I’ve been in lurk hibernation mode. Skating when it’s possible because there’s snow all over the place. Mainly just been taking a little break from non-stop skateboarding. Stoked to get back into the groove of things for the 2014 Season.

Connor: Yeah! This year should be rowdy especially with the new Push Culture race series here on the east coast. What are you looking forward to the most for 2014?

JK: Skating all over the place, having fun, and  shooting videos/photos with friends! Super stoked to get back out to Giant’s Head and the Downhill Disco!

John Kreutter going fastConnor: Do you have anything big in the works with Original? Any inside scoop that’s capable of being shared? Hahah

JK: Haha honestly don’t have anything big in the works at the moment.

Connor: Hahah alright dude that’s about it, any shout outs you wanna throw out to mom, homies, sponsors or whatever?

JK: Thank you mom. (kissy face)

Interview with Ed Nieves

Connor Bewighouse and Tom Leary snagged some time with Earthwing rider and NYC local Ed Neives to chop it up and talk skateboarding, the east coast scene, and what the future holds. Stick around to see what Ed has to say.

Ed Nieves. Photo: Steve Kong

Photo credit: Steve Kong

Connor and Tom (STE): Start with the basics; name/age/location?

Ed Nieves (EN): Name’s Ed, my best friends call me Shred. I’m 21 as of two weeks ago. Born in Manhattan, grew up in Brooklyn, still living in Brooklyn in the same neighborhood. It’s chill.

STE : Any favorite local spots?

EN: Owl’s Head Skatepark, now that I can actually skate it, is my favorite place to skate, since it’s right down the road from me and has a sweet bowl. Other than that, I like going to Watchtower, Darktower, and “uptown” hills that don’t have names (which we also don’t refer to by street names). Oh, and the skate from Times Square down to Chinatown is a sick route for mobbing through traffic.

STE: Rad. Who is the typical crew at said spots?

EN: When we’re skating bowls, it’s usually my teammates Andriy Dash and (little) Bryan Sheehy, and local favorite Max Gnar is present sometimes. Sliding at hills and stuff? It’s Kong, Tazer, Jerry, Camilo, Monica, Bryan, Max Gnar, Connor, Parker, other Max… Quite the sizable grom squad (not all mentioned here) with Kong and I playing as the parents.

STE: You and steve parents, thats fucking scary haha. Why did you start skating and what or who inspires you to keep skating?

Ed Nieves doing what he does best in NYC.

Photo: Khaleeq Alfred

EN: I started skating because I didn’t have many friends, and I sucked at every sport I tried. I mean I sucked at skating too, but I felt like it was acceptable. All the old guys who still skate vert are super inspirational for me. I look at them in their cargo shorts, kneepads and faded Black Flag t shirts doing huge boardslides in the deep end and wonder if when I’m their age I’l be reliving my youth in the same way in skinny jeans and a faded Earthwing shirt slashing frontside grinds.

STE: Fuck yea. Pros and cons to east coast downhill skating: GO!

EN: It’s fucking flat, dude. Generally, you’ve gotta go out of your way to get to a good spot, and the hope the pavement isn’t chipseal. It makes skaters more hungry, I feel, because we have to work for everything, for the most part. This leads to (generally) two types of skaters. The hardcore type that takes every opportunity to steam runs and go as fast as possible, and the ones who don’t try to travel and end up putting their driveway out of laziness. Our events are shitshows 9 times out of 10, but they’re always fun because the northeast homies are a rad, tight bunch.

STE: Great answer, couldnt have said it better myself. Speaking of these shoddily thrown together events, what is your favorite event you’ve ever attended?

EN: Making an “event” page on Facebook is not the same as making an event. Most kids don’t realize that, and they email companies to send product to their “slide jams” which is actually them and their friends skating the local hill. My favorite downhill event has been Central Mass 3, because Mike Girard knows how to do things the right way. It was a rad day of skating and lurking, with a closed road and a perfect freeride hill. My favorite event though, was two weeks ago at the House of Vans, because I met Christian Hosoi and he’s friggin awesome.

The ever steezy Ed Nieves.

Photo: Monica Mikolajczyk

STE: Yea I heard bout that! Hosoi is super rad, I’m sure you threw a couple layback grinds at his feet to show him whats good, haha. So who’s favorite downhill skater?

EN: Favorite DH skater is Josh WILD Wright. He’ll charge anything without thinking twice, and slay it harder than anyone who might be there. He’s a stout, strong fellow, and his style is beastly.

STE:  So uhhh, that’s about it…any shout-outs?

EN: Shouts out to Kong for teaching me how to coleman in 2010, Andriy for being Andriy, Babish for the photos, Connor for being the raddest 12 year old, Connor’s mom for feeding me and stuff, Brian Petrie for being awesome and generous, Tazer for never giving up, David Yang for skating with a bar in his leg, and every single Brazlian skater I keep up with on the internet (Marcelo, Rafinha, Diego, the Yuppies, etc) for inspiring me with the seemingly impossible feats you do on skateboards.

STE: Werdddddddddd! Thanks for your time dude!

EN: Thank you homie, gotta skate to the train and get to work. Peace!

6 Questions and 2 Videos with Norman Plante

If you’re unfamiliar with Norman Plante we’re about to change that. Norm has been absolutely shredding the scene in the Northeast this season and doesn’t plan on holding anything back going forward from what we’ve seen. He continually goes H.A.M. (for those of you not in the know, that’s Hard As a Motherf…well you get the point) in Stretch House Media edits with fellow Team Mids rider Eric Roth and has been killing it in competitions all over. We decided to snag 6 quick questions with Norm to learn a bit about him and his beard as well as show off two new videos he did for sponsors Eastern Boarder skate shop and Cult Wheels. You can also see him in at least a couple of our edits on YouTube, as well.

Skate The East: Who are you, who do you ride for, how long have you been riding, where are you from — that standard stuff.
Norman Plante: My name is Norman Plante I live in Holliston Massachusetts, have been skating about 3 years now and ride for Cult wheels, Eden racing and Comet skateboards

STE: So you recently joined the Cult Wheels uh…team, or is it cult? Congrats either way! How and when did that happen?
NP: Thanks man! Matt K referred my name to them after seeing me skating at the I love DH slide jam.
They had apparently seen a few of my videos too and decided to offer me a spot on the team. Super mega stoked on it.

STE: What’s been the highlight of the season for you so far?
NP: I couldn’t choose just one, but going to the Ithaca slide jam in NY and showing Ed Garner and Dan Fontz from Maryland around Mass to shred have been two exceptionally rad things to happen so far this season for sure.

STE: What are you looking forward to most for the rest of the season?
NP: Right now I’m really stoked for this years Central Mass race and slide jam in Harvard. Going to be huge, so many crazy shredders from all over the place all at one event. I’m also possibly more stoked to be going to college at the university of Redlands in socal come late august. Don’t feel like I need to explain why I’m excited for that one.

STE: Tell us about the beard.
NP: Color: Brown/Grey
Weight: 91 kilos
Width: 7.5″
Depth: deep
Rocker: yes
Hairy: yes
But I recently shaved it because im a bitch
Should be back to it’s former glory in about a week or two.

STE: What would you do for a Klondike Bar?
NP: Arson.

 

New Video and Interview with John Kreutter

If you haven’t heard of this 14 year old from Maryland yet then stop whatever you’re doing and turn your hearing aids up because this kid means business and is here to stick around. Not only does the kid SHRED on both hard and soft wheels but he also helped organize one of the best events last summer: the Baltimore Slide Jam. He also co-founded SkateMaryland.com which focuses on the longboarding scene in (you guessed it) Maryland. I got to ask John a few questions a couple weeks ago about his riding preferences, this summer’s Baltimore Slide Jam and where he derives some of his magical skating powers from. Read on for all that and more and peep his steezy new techslide video.

Skate The East: What’s your name, where are you from, how old are you, and how long have you been skating for?
John Kreutter: My name is John Kreutter, I am 14 years old, and I’ve been skating for about 4-5 years now.

STE: What setup(s) are you currently skating?
JK: Currently I’m riding the Landyachtz x Muir 12 two 5 with Bear trucks and Hawgz wheels for freeride/DH. For Park and Tech Slide i’m riding the smallest version of the “loco” which is a new tech slide board we have coming out in the 2012 Landyachtz line-up.

STE: How long has Skate Maryland been around? How’d you get the idea?
JK: Spencer Flaherty and I came up with the idea for the site about a year and a half ago. We thought it up after realizing we want wanted to get more involved in the local scene, and we figured it might be a way to find some skaters close by. Then we came up with a bunch of other ideas, and it went from there.

One of my biggest goals is to remember to update the site, everyone in a while. (We got pretty lazy for a few months there… NOW WE ARE BACK!)To gain some more site traffic, and to make videos much more frequently to post on the site.

STE: Tell a bit more about your relationship with Landyatchz, how’d you link up with them and how long have you been skating for them?
JK: I hooked up with Landyachtz early summer 2011. I decided I wanted to look for a board/wheel sponsor. At first I was checking out some smaller companies, and I just figured Landyachtz would be out of question at the time so I didn’t even consider them. I eventually realized that I’ve been riding like all Landyachtz gear and I love all of their products. So, I shot a little video and said go big or go home haha. Next thing you know I was on the team.

STE: How do you see longboarding progressing in the Mid-Atlantic? Is there already a strong scene, or is it just getting off the ground?
JK: The Mid-Atlantic area has a pretty strong scene now. Earlier on it was ok, but not too big. Now, it is pretty big and there are longboarders everywhere. Now I’ll be coming home from school and see kids with Nine Two Fives in their hands walking out of the school. There is at least one event every month, and big sessions going down every weekend. The longboarding scene is definitely progressing in a good direction, except THERE ARE NOT ENOUGH TECH SLIDERS!

STE: Last year’s Baltimore Slide Jam was off the hook from what I heard from skaters and saw in videos and photos. What do you have in store for this year? Any big surprises you’re willing to share?
JK: We are still in the early planning process for this year, but we are looking toward doing it in early June. I can tell you two things. It’s going to be extremely fun, and on a closed road. Oh, and let’s just say we might have a Brazilian in town to judge.

STE: Do you have any personal goals for this upcoming competition season? Any events you’d like to podium at?
JK: For this upcoming season I’m hoping to get out to as many events as I can. I’ll most definitely be at all of the local ones, and It looks like I’m going to California in May for the 2012 Muir Skate Downhill Disco. I hope to make it out to Canada sometime this summer for Giants Head and The Danger Bay Slide Comp. We’ll see how it goes…

STE: We can see from your videos that you’re ultra-steezy on both hard and soft wheels, do you have a preference?
JK: I don’t really have a preference, it’s normally what ever I’m feeling at the moment haha. I bring both my tech slide board and my soft wheel board to every session. I like to switch it up, and skate everything. If I’m bored of the local hills for a little bit, I’ll go to the skate park. If I get bored of that stuff I’ll skate some trails. It’s not worth it to limit yourself, It’s fun to skate everything and you guys should too!

STE: How much of your power is derived from Maryland crab-cake consumption?
JK: ALL of my power comes from EAD [Eggs All Day]. Forget the Crab Cakes! ONE QUICK SHAMELESS PLUG! HUGE THANKS TO LANDYACHTZ LONGBOARDS, MUIR SKATE, AND XS ENERGY DRINK FOR ALL OF THEIR GREAT SUPPORT!

Lifelong Longboards Announces Chris O’Brien as a new Team Rider!

Our post earlier today showing off Team Tangy’s new video couldn’t have come at a better time since we just got news that Chris O’Brien has officially been added to the Lifelong Longboards team! A warm and heartfelt congrats goes out to Chris, who we had a chance to skate and film with this past weekend.

Lifelong, while a fairly new board company, has already been making a splash with the insane amount of talk surrounding their freeride/light DH deck, “The Seeker.” In fact, Lifelong has had so much talk about “The Seeker” they decided to offer a “pre-sale” version with only a stained-wood finish and white “Lifelong” logo on it which, in my opinion, looks beautiful. Something to make them even sweeter? They’re a local East Coast company based out of Massachusetts meaning they support the East Coast stoke and scene hard! We posted a video featuring the Seeker by Douglass Schmidt not long ago showing its prowess with some downhill and downhill freeriding and recently were shown another video showing it’s freestyle capabilities!

I asked Chris to answer a few questions for us after we heard about the announcement which you can find below:

Skate The East: How’d you and the guys from Lifelong link up?
Chris O’Brien: A lot of facebook groups and friends informed me about Lifelong even before they released the Rebel. I had been following their progress for a while and had been talking to a few team members. Finally asked them and it was a yes!

STE: What’s your current setup? Future setup? 
CO: My current setup is a comet voodoo d2, SZ indeesz 177mm, Pink Powerballs
Future setup is same thing but with a Lifelong Seeker deck.

STE: What or who influences your skating the most? 
CO: I think my good friend Jake Wade influences my skating the most. We work very well together and end up pushing each other’s limits through competition.

STE: What are your goals for this upcoming season? 
CO: This season i basically want to go faster, go bigger, and have fun in the process!

STE: What’s next for Team Tangy? 
CO: We’re gonna keep doing what we’re doing, making edits and improving our skills!

STE: Simple question, Kool Aid or Tang? 
CO: Despite the similarities to Tang, I’m going to have to go with Kool Aid, classic drink.

Interview: 2011 Adrennalina Tour Champion Paul Kent

With rain blasting a large part of the East right now and it being the end of Hump Day I couldn’t resist posting this for everyone to enjoy. If you’re a regular reader of the site by now you should at least know Paul from our coverage of the Adrennalina Skateboard Marathon Tour which wrapped-up on November 5th with Paul being crowned first ever Tour Champion. In addition to his Adrennalina fame most people also know Paul from his Long Treks On Skate Decks video series, the Paskapoo Downhill Rodeo, GreenSkate and eating celery at the steakhouses. You can catch up with him on www.skaterpaul.com. He is sponsored by Orangatang wheels, Rayne longboards, Royal Boardshop, Vega Sport, and rides with various other teams. I got a chance to talk to Paul via e-mail once he got back to Canada after the Adrennalina Championship for a short interview, telling how he first got into distance skating, how he felt about the last Adrennalina race, and so much more. Paul is making a big name for himself in distance skating and it’s pretty clear he’s just heating up, check out the interview below and see for yourself.

STE: Skate The East: Right now you’re living up in Calgary but mentioned to me on Twitter that you’re originally from the East. Where are you from originally and what took you out to the base of the Canadian Rockies?

Paul Kent: I am originally from Cambridge Ontario, just about 45 minutes west of Toronto. My Dad’s family is from Wabana Newfoundland, which is as east as it gets. Anyways, ten years ago the longboard scene in Cambridge consisted of myself, Marcel Robert, and about 14 other super casual carvers. I would have to drive out to Dundas to skate with Mike Civindino our (then) Canadian slalom champ, or to Toronto to ride with their small group of 10-20 odd kids serious with Downhill riding. I felt I had quickly outgrown the talent base as I wanted to learn from more experienced riders. I decided to find riders out west to learn from and I connected with the parts of Jody Willcock’s crew. (Jody is the inventor of the drop deck). I still identify with Ontario as being where I come from and I miss riding my hometown and the escarpment.

STE: In addition to being the recently crowned 1st ever Adrenalina Skateboard Marathon Champion after a stellar season you’re also well known for your incredibly long distance skateboard backpacking adventures. How did you first enter the world of distance longboarding, and what has motivated you to keep pushing and pumping after all these miles?

PK: Well first off Jeff was the first Adrenalina champ. I am the first tour champion. I failed miserably at last years Adrenalina in Hallendale. Haha. But to answer your question, I began riding to work through rain, shine, even two inch deep snow. When I was late I would have to sprint to work on my board. By the time a year had gone by I had cut my work commute in half. I had done well in a Central park race in New York, but it wasnt until the fall of 2007 that it really happened. I was invited to the push race “King of the Forest” in Vancouver by Mike Benda and Rocky. Having no money for a bus, I joked to my friends and family that maybe I should skate there. They didn’t realize I was joking and started helping me prepare. Haha. Then they agreed it was a stupid crazy idea but I was the craziest person they knew. I packed up my hiking pack with lightweight gear and I skated there. I Got to the race and took the top spot of any Canadian, however loosing to Robin (The Leg) McGuirk and Jon Huey. It was a great trip of self discovery, freezing nearly to death at the top of mountain passes and running from wild animals, skating alone in the dark in places where there are no lights. And then a great race where I saw podium. This touring and push racing thing really had captivated me.

STE: You and Jeff Vyain crossed the finish line hand-in-hand to tie the 1st Adrenalina Skateboard Marathon Championship this past weekend, what was your first thought when you finally caught up to Jeff and he suggested you share the prizes and podium?

PK: My first thought when Jeff offered to go splits was “yes, sound offer.” we both earned it, and I still felt it was anyone’s win. I had caught up to Jeff and took the lead, he then caught up to me about a half mile further and that’s when he proposed the prize split. We skated for a few seconds, then I suggested we shake on it before continuing our race against eachother. Now honestly I didn’t consider this to mean we were supposed to cross the finish together. I began surging to the finish. He and then bounced back and fourth for the lead and charged all but feet from the line. I pushed to the fastest speed I could possibly go and Jeff was still beside me. That’s when I reached for his hand. I did it without looking and he grabbed my arm. We both won, literally and figuratively.

STE: What was the general reaction by the spectators?

PK: The spectators were stoked. I think they really appreciate that we’re not easy on eachother and we pushed faster times, yet in the end it’s about camaraderie, helping eachother to grow as athletes, and being stoked for eachother.

STE: You and Jeff Vyain have arguably the most famous “rivalry” in longboarding right now. When did you guys first run into each other and how did you become “best frenemies?”

PK: Our first encounter was online. He wrote me to tell me he wanted to race me. We met in Hallendale and I wasn’t feeling optimal. He won that race, I hung out with him the rest of that night talking at him and sharing technical info with him. I’m sure he thought I was a chump, but I was stoked to have found a true nemesis. Someone to share and help me become better, by sometimes being better then me. I followed what he did online, in interviews and in his community and became certain he was a good role model and ambassador for longboarding and push race. Our next race was the Cheif Ladiga 188 mile and I won, earning Jeff’s respect. At the after party we had a great talk about our responsibility to the sport. That got us off on the same foot.

STE: How do you intend to spend the off-season this year?

PK: I read lots in the winter. Its when I learn about how to train and eat better. I will be doing more weight lifting, some cross country skiing and running. Although not so much as to over-train before the season begins. I also need to do some physiotherapy. Hopefully I’ll get to head to Cali or Van for some downhill skateboarding through the winter. And of course I’ll be back to working a real job.

STE: You’ve said you have a career goal of a 1:20:00 marathon, what other goals for longboarding in general do you have?

PK: My goals are to help the sport grow in a positive and sustainable way, to help produce some world class skaters in various genres, to create a LongTreks film, start a better bearing company, start downhilling in contests again and of course running as close to 1:20:00 as humanly possible. I’m really aiming to break 1:26:00 next year. But it will depend on the course and the weather.

STE: If you could have anything in the world, prepared by the best of the best, what would be your dream pre-race/long skate meal?

PK: My best dream pre race meal would be the best cheesecake in the world, or best in the dream world for that matter! But since I do not exist in the dream world, I’ll stick to sweet potatoes with a garnish of vegan gummy bears, Vega sport optimizer and ginger kombucha. Unfortunately the best of the bests talents would be wasted on pre-race meals as the GI tract won’t tolerate the best foods during these races. It sucks! But if the Best chefs would take a rain check, I’d be glad to have some mean Mali kofta with Lacha prantha after the race.

STE: Best of luck in the off-season, hopefully you get some deserved rest and relaxation before the grind of training starts again!

PK: Thank you very much. Rest and relaxation is in in full effect right now. But physiotherapy and trigger-point therapy begin soon, followed by weights and fitness maintenance. Say hi to the east for me. I miss her.

We’re stoked Paul took the time to talk to us and wish him the best for the off season!

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