Major Stok’em 6 – 4/19

Major Stok'em 6 Flyer

Plug Fort Lee, NJ into your GPS and get ready, because Major Stok’em is back again on April 19th from 9AM to 5PM for its 6th year running! Major Stok’em has become one of the best events for new racers to break into the sport and see what they’re made of, even giving them a chance go toe to toe with some of the Tri-State area’s fastest on a relatively mellow course. This is the race where some of the fastest east coast riders got their start – so if you’ve been looking for an ‘entry level race’ you might not find a better opportunity this season.

The Course

Taking place at the Palisades Interstate Park in Fort Lee, NJ the Major Stok’em 6 course is set next to the scenic banks of the Hudson River, just across the river from New York City. The course is known for varying in speed depending on whether there’s a headwind or tailwind, so you’re looking at speeds that could range from a cruising 22MPH up to around 39MPH, much more mellow than what you’ll find at some of the bigger races this summer.

There aren’t any extremely technical features to navigate or anything of the sort, it’s a pretty straight forward course all in all,  running about a 1/4 mile long in total. It does feature a crash corner at the end which seems to claim far more riders than necessary but also create some exciting last minute passes.

For parents bringing their children or for riders going to the course for the first time: There’s no real address for where to park and meet. Use Google Maps and look for the Ross Dock Area, the NJ State website might also help a bit (http://www.njpalisades.org/picnic.htm#Ross). Since it’s off-season when the race goes down, parking will be free!

Major Stok'em 6

Registration

This is important because it doesn’t go down like other events, so pay close attention. Registration will be on Saturday, April 12th – exactly one week before the race. Registration is capped at 100 riders, so don’t be too late in registering or you might miss out. Registration for the event is $40.01. On April 12th you PayPal $0.01 (that’s one cent) to majorstokem@gmail.com, which reserves your spot to race. On race day, when you go to sign-in, bring $40 in cash and your waiver to finalize everything.

It can be a little confusing, so head over to the Stok’em website and read how they describe the process.

Event Schedule

This is directly from the Major Stok’em website. I’ll do my best to update it with any changes as I become aware of them.

6:30AM-8:30AM    EVENT SET-UP HAYBALES AND VOLUNTEERS

8:00AM -9:00AM  REGISTRATION PROCESS (MUST BE A PRE-REGISTERED RIDER)

9:OOAM-9:45AM   PRACTICE RUNS (LIGHT RUNS AND GET TO KNOW THE HILL)  **END OF REGISTRATION**

10:00AM                   RIDERS SAFETY MEETING NEAR THE FINISH LINE. RACE OFFICIALLY STARTS.

5:00PM                      END OF EVENT/CLEANUP

Additional Information

Go check out the FAQ over on the Major Stok’em 6 website and check out the Facebook Event as well. Spectators and non-racers will be aplenty, so even if you don’t feel like racing come out and chill as the season starts to get underway.

ACME Extreme Downhill: Port Jervis, NY 8/31-9/1

The ACME Extreme Downhill longboard and luge race will be going down in Port Jervis, New York on August 31st and September 1st (Labor Day Weekend 2013) and is shaping up to be one gnarly event. Presented by LongboardLoft.com and hosted by New Jersey native and Bergen County Bombers founder Tom Barnhart, the race is drawing some of the  fastest racers in east coast downhill to one of the gnarliest closed road courses.

ACME Extreme Downhill Port Jervis, NJ 8/31-9/1

The Course

The course is fast, fun, and technical, coming in at around a mile long and featuring speeds in the low 40’s and 2 technical hairpin turns with a nice and smooth surface. The event is broken into two days, Saturday (8/31) is Day One is for registration, technical inspection, and practice runs all day, while Day 2 on Sunday (9/1) will be the actual race. There are 150 race spots available, once those fill up you’ll be able to register to skate the practice runs, but won’t get a chance to compete for the cash prize.

You can see an outline of the course on the flyer above.

Cash Prize

Tom did a great job getting a lot of sponsors on board and put together a sizable CASH PRIZE for the winners. It’s a bit confusing, but it looks like if there are 150 registered riders it’s a $2,000 total prize purse to be split between stand up and luge. If under 150 riders register then it’s only a $1,000 prize purse. The prizes will be weighted accordingly to the number of riders in each cash-prize eligible race. Things will be more clear by race day, but there’s money to win. We’re not sure if there’s a cash prize if under 100 riders are registered…although Facebook has over 300 people listed as “in attendance.” We’ll check on this and get back to y’all soon. We’ve been told that it’s unlikely the 100 person registration floor won’t be met, but if that’s the case then prizes in the form of swag and gear will be awarded to the winners.

Registration Options

As always there are multiple options for registration. If you’d only like to skate the practice sessions you’re able to buy a pass for Saturday only (which should be pretty fun in and of itself) or you can choose to race in the luge race, or one of the stand up classes. All classes require you to wear a helmet, gloves, while AM classes will also have to wear knee and elbow pads. As of this posting (8/23) there are 40 registered riders, 20 of whom are making the trek down from Canada with many more riders committed but not signed up.

Practice Pass

  • Practice Only Saturday under 16 (1 day)
  • Practice Only Saturday over 17 (1 day)

Luge

Competing for cash prizes:

  • Lay Down Open (2 days, butt board, classic and street luge – leathers mandatory for all lay down even practice)

Stand Up Pro

These classes will be eligible for both the cash prizes and longboard gear/swag.

  • Stand Up Pro Open (2 days)
  • Stand Up Pro Women (2 days)
  • Stand Up Pro Junior Under Age 17 (2 days; leathers required)

Stand Up AM

These classes will be competing for gear/longboarding swag, not the cash prizes:

  • Stand Up Am Open (2 days)
  • Stand Up Am Junior Age 14 – 17 (2 days)
  • Stand Up AM Grom Under Age 13 (2 days)

Registration Pricing

Price/time…………………..………….Aug….Day-of
Practice Saturday Only Under 16…..$70…..$90
Practice Saturday Only Over 17…….95………115
One Class (Sat and Sun)…………….145……..165
Two Classes (stand up/lay down)…195……..215
(an additional processing fee applies not to exceed $10 applies across the board)

Hopefully this makes sense, but basically if you register in August, before the event, there’s a pretty significant discount. Head over to Active.com to register, there’s a processing fee that you’ll have to pay somewhere along the road that shouldn’t be more than $10, so factor that in to the prices above. In the end, to race one class it’ll cost you around $155 total if you register in advance, or $175 if you register day-of.

Schedule

The schedule for both days is as follows:

Day One – Saturday, August 31, 2013
7am – Sign In / Registration and Inspection
8am – Course is open for practice runs skate
12pm- Lunch Break
1pm – Resume Practice
7pm – closing day 1 and clean up.

Day Two – Sunday, September 1, 2013
7am – Sign in
8am – Course opens for practice runs
9am – DH Points Series for Stand Up and Luge
12pm – Lunch Break
1pm – Finish Points, Continue with Quarter Finals
5pm – closing awards ceremony day two and clean up.

Camping

There is group camping located at the Oakland Valley Campground in Cuddlebackville, NY. The cost is $5.50 per person per night with no minimum. According to Tom you can fish from your tent, and they’ve got a swimming pool and showers for you to use. Call them directly to make your reservation and tell them you’re with the ACME Extreme Downhill Race to get the special group rate (not advertised on their website).

Parking

Racers will park at the top of the hill and won’t be able to leave with the exception of lunch which will run from noon to 1.

Spectators will park at the West Beach and on Saturday. Organizers will be running a shuttle by radio from the beach to hill. On Sunday the shuttle will run every 20 minutes from noon to close.

Area Map

Tom put together this area map highlighting some of the key points you might need to know.


View ACME Extreme Downhill – The Venue in a larger map

ACME Extreme Downhill Course Preview

Make sure to e-mail Tom at tom@mortgagecom.com with any questions or call him at (201)470-GNAR. You can also leave a comment below and we’ll do our best to get you an answer, or mosey over to the Facebook Event.

How To Not Blow A Spot

Clyde Man

Our buddy Clyde and the Massachusetts Skate, I mean State, Police.

Over the past few years, as this sport has continued to grow, it has become apparent that many of the newer generations of shredders do not follow the rules of the road, and therefore potentially blow the spot for themselves and others. If you have never had an interaction with a police officer or person of authority, you’re probably unaware that this sport is still frowned upon, even illegal in some areas, and have to always keep that fact in mind.

This means that when you’re skating a road, you gotta treat it like it’s your Granny’s house, that is, you gotta respect it.  People bash other people for stealing their spots all the time, but in reality, most spots are actually pretty easy to find if you know what you’re doing.  So those groms that you didn’t want to find that dope spot you had, they’re gonna find out about it, and when they do, it’s in everyone’s best interest that they know how to respect it.  No one owns any one spot, everyone wants to progress, and there are only so many dope runs in a given area, so chances are as the sport grows, your favorite runs will be skated by others. Many things go into properly respecting a road, and all roads are different, but there are some general rules that should be followed.

“This means that when you’re skating a road, you gotta treat it like it’s your Granny’s house, that is, you gotta respect it.”

First off, it all depends on the spot you’re shredding since all spots are different.  If you’re at your local freeride hill and you got all the neighbors you know and you’re comfortable, then it’s usually ok to post up and hang out, shredding the hill for an extended period of time.  On hills that are like this, you gotta respect neighbors’ opinions, as well as yield to any traffic.  You also can’t leave the hill a mess, leave it in better condition than you found it, don’t leave your water bottle and lunch bags, those weren’t there when you got there, were they?  Another thing to consider is acting sketchy.  Eddie HaskellMad kids act sketchy when they are dealing with adults, because they don’t know the vibe yet and are uncomfortable with the interaction.  When you see someoneacting nice and polite, you are bound to judge them a bit different than if they are acting all sketchy not saying hi, avoiding interaction, or being obnoxious.  When neighbors, locals, and old people are walking by observing you skating, wave, smile, and say hi. Take a second to talk to them, usually they dig it, and usually it will help you in keeping your spot from being blown.  When it comes to traffic in neighborhood runs, just yield and show that you’re in control. Even if you have the control to setup carve into the opposite lane and throw a little backside check in front of that oncoming car, it looks mad sketchy to that car and almost any other random civilian watching.  I always see people continuing their run with a car behind them on their tail, or with a car pulling out of a driveway, or an oncoming car.  If you just come to a stop and wait 5 seconds, it decreases your chances of having the cops called on you.

Another thing to consider, and this is for all types of spots, is that the more people you have with you, the higher the chance that your sess is gonna get blown.  I sometimes see grom crews that are about 30 strong all ripping the same hill – an easy way to quickly blow a good spot.  When skating runs that involve blind turns, always spot the turn, and don’t just spot it, know that you can hit it in the worst situation, know that when that school bus is stuck in his 5 point turn, that you can come to a stop.

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Video: Skatesgiving Hangs Loose

Not only do I think this is my favorite Skatesgiving 2012 video yet — this might be my favorite longboarding video. Our good buddy Brian Peck, Anthony Flis, Matt K, Patt Schep and Ben Dubes keep it super chill on a super fun looking downhill run as well as the Woodward Snake Run. I can’t express how jealous I am because that snake run looks like the most fun thing ever — a new thing on my bucket list without a doubt. Check it out and let us know what you think in the comments.

Videos: Yokesgiving

The Yoke Crew out of Maryland is at it again, teaming up with Tom Leary to produce some gnarly east coast downhill videos on some of the most legendary roads. This is a raw run and parts one and two of what we’ve heard to be a three part series, so more gnar is expected to come. These guys don’t need much more of an introduction so just sit tight and watch them rip. Skaters include Ed Garner, Colin Martin, Dan Fontz, probably more we missed.

– Mike and Connor