5 Photos with Khaleeq Alfred

The following is a guest post by Khaleeq Alfred, a New York City native, skater, and photographer. We linked up with Khaleeq and asked him to share 5 of his favorite photos along with a quick description. Learn a bit more about Khaleeq and check out his unreal photos below, then share ’em with a friend.  

Name’s Khaleeq, born and raised in Harlem NYC. Been doing photography for about 4 years now, but been shooting skate stuff for about a year and a half. Been skating for around 5 years, and loving every minute of it. Can’t get enough of the skate community and enjoy photographing it. Weapon of choice: 5D Mark II (my baby). Stoked on what’s in store for 2013!!!!!

Photo: Khaleeq Alfred | Rider: Cami Best

Photo: Khaleeq Alfred | Rider: Cami Best

What can I say, Cami throws down. It’s not often I see her skate, got lucky recently and did a little shooting. Blunt slides for days!

Photo: Khaleeq Alfred | Rider: Leon Vincent-Vialva

Photo: Khaleeq Alfred | Rider: Leon Vincent-Vialva

Got a 24-105mm Lseries and a 50mm in my arsenal. That 50 is my love, photos come out flawless, I’m always amazed. This photo is part of my “One of Many” collection. Leon of Blue Sky Longboards killing it.

Photo: Khaleeq Alfred | Rider: Ross Druckery

Photo: Khaleeq Alfred | Rider: Ross Druckery

Took a trip down to Puerto Rico to shoot Guajataca 2013 for Ghostskate and snapped this. Ross Druckrey shredding at the jam, so much Steez and a gnarly hill.

Photo: Khaleeq Alfred | Rider: Steven Sanchez

Photo: Khaleeq Alfred | Rider: Steven Sanchez

Sanchez ALWAYS puts me to work. By far one of my favorite people to shoot with. Took a whole day to shoot out in queens NY with the Bustin crew. Sick shots, steezy skating, perfect scenery and worth the tons of skating.

Photo: Khaleeq Alfred | Rider: Noish

Photo: Khaleeq Alfred | Rider: Noish

When you finish editing all your photos from a good day of shooting, you come across a couple photos that stand out. To me, this one is just stunning. Great scenery + stoked skater = Dope photos. Big thanks to Noish always bringing his A game. So sick, many more like it!

How To Not Blow A Spot

Clyde Man

Our buddy Clyde and the Massachusetts Skate, I mean State, Police.

Over the past few years, as this sport has continued to grow, it has become apparent that many of the newer generations of shredders do not follow the rules of the road, and therefore potentially blow the spot for themselves and others. If you have never had an interaction with a police officer or person of authority, you’re probably unaware that this sport is still frowned upon, even illegal in some areas, and have to always keep that fact in mind.

This means that when you’re skating a road, you gotta treat it like it’s your Granny’s house, that is, you gotta respect it.  People bash other people for stealing their spots all the time, but in reality, most spots are actually pretty easy to find if you know what you’re doing.  So those groms that you didn’t want to find that dope spot you had, they’re gonna find out about it, and when they do, it’s in everyone’s best interest that they know how to respect it.  No one owns any one spot, everyone wants to progress, and there are only so many dope runs in a given area, so chances are as the sport grows, your favorite runs will be skated by others. Many things go into properly respecting a road, and all roads are different, but there are some general rules that should be followed.

“This means that when you’re skating a road, you gotta treat it like it’s your Granny’s house, that is, you gotta respect it.”

First off, it all depends on the spot you’re shredding since all spots are different.  If you’re at your local freeride hill and you got all the neighbors you know and you’re comfortable, then it’s usually ok to post up and hang out, shredding the hill for an extended period of time.  On hills that are like this, you gotta respect neighbors’ opinions, as well as yield to any traffic.  You also can’t leave the hill a mess, leave it in better condition than you found it, don’t leave your water bottle and lunch bags, those weren’t there when you got there, were they?  Another thing to consider is acting sketchy.  Eddie HaskellMad kids act sketchy when they are dealing with adults, because they don’t know the vibe yet and are uncomfortable with the interaction.  When you see someoneacting nice and polite, you are bound to judge them a bit different than if they are acting all sketchy not saying hi, avoiding interaction, or being obnoxious.  When neighbors, locals, and old people are walking by observing you skating, wave, smile, and say hi. Take a second to talk to them, usually they dig it, and usually it will help you in keeping your spot from being blown.  When it comes to traffic in neighborhood runs, just yield and show that you’re in control. Even if you have the control to setup carve into the opposite lane and throw a little backside check in front of that oncoming car, it looks mad sketchy to that car and almost any other random civilian watching.  I always see people continuing their run with a car behind them on their tail, or with a car pulling out of a driveway, or an oncoming car.  If you just come to a stop and wait 5 seconds, it decreases your chances of having the cops called on you.

Another thing to consider, and this is for all types of spots, is that the more people you have with you, the higher the chance that your sess is gonna get blown.  I sometimes see grom crews that are about 30 strong all ripping the same hill – an easy way to quickly blow a good spot.  When skating runs that involve blind turns, always spot the turn, and don’t just spot it, know that you can hit it in the worst situation, know that when that school bus is stuck in his 5 point turn, that you can come to a stop.

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5 Ways to Beat the Heat While Skating

heatWith Memorial Day behind us and a few days with temperatures over the 90˚F mark with suffocating humidity and it’s safe to say that summer is in full effect for the east coast. The nice and breezy spring days are behind us, which means that you’re gonna have to try harder than ever to stay cool and prevent heat exhaustion (and the much more serious, potentially fatal, heat stroke) and stay on the hill as long as possible. While they’re not foolproof, these 5 things will help you beat the usually oppressive east coast summer weather.

Continue reading and find out our top 5 ways to beat the heat!

Don’t Shred On Me: Volume 1

Watch as Brian Peck and Ryan Howard take to some snow filled parks in Connecticut as well as some local neighborhood hills for a perfect early spring east coast chiller skate day. The first volume of our “Don’t Shred on Me Series,” it sets the tone for the “skate everything” types of videos and articles you’ll see in this column. The weather was a bit nippy but the vibes were perfect and rays stayed steady enough to keep us going. All in all it was a great testament to what east coast skaters have to fight through to have a great session, and helps us really value those perfect days we long for. Give us a like, share with your friends, and subscribe if you already haven’t!