Earthwing N.L.S.: New Deck Technology and Lineup

I got an e-mail from Earthwing head honcho Brian Petrie giving me the scoop on a new technology and deck line they’re dropping, dubbed N.L.S. (Next Level Shit).

Earthwing N.L.S. 37 and 40

Earthwing N.L.S. 37 and 40

Earthwing N.L.S. decks are made using a crush-welding processes that presses each deck individually (many decks are pressed en masse) in an aluminum mold under heat and pressure. There’s no glue involved and the bond formed is  stronger than the core material itself,  so delams are said to be a thing of the past. The core is then pressed in between layers of what Earthwing calls Unbeleivium, a rigid fibrous material that adds “unusually stiff torsional support” to the deck. What’s all this mean? It means that you get a deck with a 4 ply core that’s just as stiff as a 9 ply deck. Less weight but the same stiffness is better for your skateboarding.

Earthwing N.L.S. 40 holding 96oz of water.

Earthwing N.L.S. 40 holding 96oz of water.

The decks will also feature 360 degree concave that essentially forms a giant bowl on the deck. Brian said they were able to fill one with 96oz of water and sent a picture to prove it. Not the first time we’ve seen ‘cereal bowl concave’ if I remember correctly, but impressive stuff none the less. An added bonus? It’s all made here in the USA and is clean, green and recyclable.

The first two decks featuring the new technology will be the Earthwing N.L.S. 40 and N.L.S. 37. They’re describing the 40 as a symmetrical free ride/park deck while the 37 is a directional speed board with a functional kick tail. Full stats and dimensions are below.

If you want to get your hands on one of these bad boys they’ll be available worldwide in just a few days, on March 1st 2014.

N.L.S. 40 N.L.S. 37
Dimensions 40″ x 10″ 37″ x 9.875″
Wheelbase 20 13/16″ – 24″ 20 13/16″ – 24″
Nose 4 5/8″ – 7 1/8″ 1 1/2″ – 4″
Tail 4 5/8″ – 7 1/8″ 4 5/8″ – 7 1/8″

Earthwing N.L.S. Concave

Bustin’ Boards Announces 2013 Lineup

As the weather gets nicer it’s hard to not get excited for the season to start, and the new product releases we’ve been seeing aren’t making it much easier. Bustin’ today announced their 2013 lineup with major additions to their Yoface, Maestro, and Camber families and a new freeride wheel family dubbed the Five-O Series.

YofaceLineUp-2013_03

The Yoface family picture.

We’ll start where people seem to be most excited: the new Yoface models. The Yoface 35 became a smash hit amongst DK enthusiasts after its release last year and the team over at Bustin’ didn’t waste much time working to improve it’s design and functionality even more. Featuring a beautiful cereal bowl concave that maintains its shape right to the tails and flared wheel wells, you can now find the Yoface in two additional lengths: a shorter 32″ version for a more street-deck feel at 8.675″ wide, or a longer 39″ version for added foot platform and deck real estate when going fast at 9.5″ wide. These boards transition seamlessly from city streets with big wheels, to shredding bowls and bombing hills. The graphic on the Yoface 39 is my favorite yet from Bustin’, too dope. You can pick up the Yoface 32 for $70, Yoface 35 for $75, and the Yoface 39 for $95 at your favorite local skateshop that carries Bustin’.

yoface39_03

The new Yoface 39

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Maestro Mini V2

While there’s been an added focus on their DH/freeride decks and the Yoface, Bustin’ has managed to stay true to their roots and are making changes to two of their classic board families: the Maestro and Camber Series. This year they’re making big changes to the MaestroPro in an attempt to make the classic city commuter into a more formidable freeride option as well as introducing version 2 of the Maestro Mini.  Both the MaestroPro and Maestro Mini V2 feature symmetrical shapes, unlike the forward cambered design of the Maestro Classic, so you can jump on and rip them without thinking about which direction the deck is facing.

The MaestroPro is constructed using 6 plies of maple and sublimated triaxial fiberglass to add stiffness without the excess weight caused by more wood. It features a rockered shape, cambered foot platform, and signature low ride to make it ultra comfortable when commuting, and multiple wheelbase options to help you adjust the amount of flex the board gives. The Maestro Mini V2 features many of the same upgrades that the MaestroPro got, with the exception of the sublimated triaxial fiberglass, instead using the same 8 ply Maple construction found on the Maestro Classic. With its squat shape the Maestro Mini V2 has some fatter kicktails and should make commuting a blast as it looks like you can really manhandle this board without much effort. The MaestroPro comes in at 38″ long and 9″ wide, while the Maestro Mini V2 stands at 34″ long and 8.75″ wide. Despite only being 4″ shorter in length, the Maestro Mini V2’s wheelbase is almost 6″ shorter than the MaestroPro and should be super agile for navigating on city streets or campus sidewalks. The MaestroPro will set you back $175 and the Maestro Mini V2 will put you back $95.

maestroPro_side_profile_21_01

The MaestroPro

The Camber Series, comprised of the Cigar 38 and Cigar 31, got some upgrades this year as well. A variation of a classic flexy pintail, these topmount decks are great for casual spring and summertime cruises. Gentle concave mixed with gentle camber and a flexy platform make for a great pumping/push deck to allow you to cruise without much effort or foot fatigue. Multiple wheelbase options allow you to dial in how much flex you need and feature CNC’ed wheel wells. Simple and straightforward cruiser decks, nothing too complicated here. Both are available now for $95 and $80 for the Cigar 38 and 31 respectively.

five-o wheels lineup

Finally, Bustin’ released their new freeride wheel for 2013, the Five-O Series, in two different versions: 64mm with a centerset core, and 72mm with a sideset core. The translucent wheels (which we have to imagine leaves some gnarly thane lines) feature a small core to maximize thane depth and minimize the chance of a core blow-out and are made to be ridden hard. Bustin’ is advertising them as a no bullish*t wheel, just pure thane that slides consistently and predictably without the need for any frills, a refreshing and exciting take on wheels.  The 64mm version comes in 80a and 85a durometers while the 72mm version can be found in 77a ad 80a. The 64mm wheels were designed as an all around wheel with the Yoface in mind, while the 72mm version were designed specifically to be ridden fast on hills as a freeride wheel, hence the sideset core and bigger size. Whenever I hear a wheel described as “crayon on construction paper” I get very excited, so expect a first-hand look at these wheels in the near future.

That’s it for now. We’re psyched to see our friends in NYC doing some big things and continuing to push the sport forward on all fronts. It’s nice to know that while Bustin’ has been focusing on the freeride/downhill scene recently, they haven’t lost sight of their roots in the City and are producing boards for all types of riders, from park skaters to the city commuter and out to the hills. I’m excited to see the new Yoface and Five-O wheels in person soon and will be sure to report back when we do.

SkateThe604 Previews the New 2013 Landyachtz Top Speed

2013TopSpeed5Landyachtz is going to have a big year ahead of them and we’re super excited. The 2013 WolfShark looks like it’ll be the best version of the beloved directional top mount we’ve seen yet and the rest of of the line-up is starting to flesh itself out slowly. SkateThe604 recently posted a whole bunch of pictures and information about the newest board to show it’s skin, the Top Speed, on their Facebook Page.

After about 8 months of design and prototyping the final version of the Top Speed sure is something to take a look at. The bottom of the board will feature a ply of fiberglass with sublimated graphics, in keeping with what we saw on the 2013 WolfShark (and apparently what we’ll see on most of the 2013 decks), which will add some stiffness without the need for extra weight. The graphic, in my opinion, is one of the cooler ones I’ve seen in a while, and is drastically different from the Landy graphics we’ve become used to.

2013TopSpeed4

The length of the deck comes in at 34.5″ long and 9″ wide with a 25.5″ wheelbase and “W” concave. The Top Speed also features some subtle wheel-well flares that we haven’t seen on a Landy board before. They look like they rise nicely out of the concave and should create a nice pocket when mixed with the W, something I’m curious to see for myself. Since I haven’t even seen this deck in person yet, you’ll have to differ to what SkateThe604 has to say about the size and shape, although it sounds like welcome news for you smaller riders out there and very comfortable.

For shorter people with small feet like me, this board was designed for you. What I most like about the specs is the width; traditionally boards are 10” wide. I have small feet so I could never really freeride 10” boards since I like to have a bit of heel hang. With the steadily rising of new groms coming into the longboard scene this will be a well suited board … The newest features to this year are the flairs. I find the flairs on this board is just perfect, it really locks your foot in, really nice to push your foot up against. I’ve ridden many other boards with flairs or flair like features but found them to always be too aggressive.

2013TopSpeed1

Tip of the hat again to SkateThe604 for the scoop, we’re excited to get a chance to see this thing in person soon enough.