The Goose: The Rad Dad

Rad Dad’s live among us. They created us, raised us, and have supported us through good and bad times. For some of the young shredders, your rad dad may even take you to events, help pay for gear, drive you to local sessions, and even hops on board here and there to prove he’s still got it from back in his day. Not all of us have the pleasure of having a rad dad; but hopefully many of you do. My dad is extremely rad and if you would like some proof look no further than this video:

Within the past year and a half I’ve had the pleasure of getting to know Quentin LaChance and his Rad Dad Goosen or as many of us call him “the Goose”. I first met them at a freeride session in Providence, Rhode Island. Nowadays I often meet up with them in Portsmouth with the URI dudes for some really gnarly sessions.

Goose the Rad Dad

The Goose getting gnarly

Quentin is 14 and shreds harder and goes bigger every time I see him. He’s always having a good time and I anticipate awesome things for him in 2014. LaChance is from Mass., where he is currently attending middle school as an eighth grader. He started skating about two years ago and has since become a well-respected member of the east coast longboarding community. He has recently built his own longboard with the help of Stephan Vaast of Arson Longboards. When he is not skating he is painting during the long winter months but is super stoked to get out skating again this spring.

Quentin poking out a toeside

Quentin poking out a toeside

Quentin rides for Team Pup n’ Suds which vibes a carefree attitude.  Having fun, skating to impress yourself and getting to the level you want to be at is the name of the game here.

Peep this summer edit of Pup N Suds:

“The raddest dad and most down to earth grom around” said Chris Rideout, Rhode Island homie and frequent host of the CT Wheelabrator event.

Quentin and the Goose are as stoked as they come about downhill skateboarding. These two with out a doubt have become a growing part of the east coast community. Having attended major east coast events such as Longboard for Life in North Andover Mass., Central Mass in Harvard and Wheelabrator in CT, these guys continue to hit rad sessions all over the New England area and are of course stoked for what the 2014 season has to offer.

Goose and the hound pose for a picture on puddling stone

Goose and the hound pose for a picture on puddling stone

Goose the dad is rad, just ask homeless Eric of Nelson Longboards “Goosen is the way, heed his words carefully.”

“Organized sports for our children have changed drastically these days, everyone wins a trophy and that sends the wrong message, that it doesn’t matter what effort you put in because at the end of the day everyone’s still a winner. In real life it’s not like that and when I grew up there was a competitive push to work hard to become better. The favoritism and politics involved in organized youth sports allows the coach’s son to become the quarter back, or allow for unfair amounts of playing time, these sports are often run by parents trying to find profit.

Skaters compete against themselves, reaching for their personal best. This has allowed kids to spend the day outside and put as little or as much effort into it as they would like. This sport is purely for fun, and the rider decides how seriously they would like to take it. They are their own coach and set their own goals. The community is extremely friendly. Skaters of all skill level skate together in peace and are always supportive of one and other. The most experienced riders are always there to encourage and support the less experienced, they promote progression, and don’t put others down. Skaters find achievement based on how well they feel after each run, and how their buddies react to the fat stand up you just threw down in front of them. This sport is a great hobby for my son, and I am happy to be apart of it. I believe there should be more father’s getting involved in the sport and recognize the positive attributes that skateboarding has to offer.”

If you are an east coast shredder it won’t be long before you meet the Goose. He is super stoked on the sport and can often be found filming the session on his GoPro, or giving rides back up the hill in his pick up truck. The Goose will hop on board occasionally but he’s really there to have a good time with everyone and watch the fun happen. Aside from being involved the in the skate scene, you can find him tending to his chickens, working on his garden, goofing around with his pet hound, out fishing, or picking his guitar.

Follow the Goose on his Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/thegoosenspage

Goosen tending to his chickens living in his homemade coop

Goosen tending to his chickens living in his homemade coop

“After becoming involved with this community through my son, and after spending much of my time in organized sports with my older sons, I believe that the kids involved in longboarding are ahead of the curve for what it means to be truly alive and experience life to its full potential. They get out doors, stay healthy with exercise, and really appreciate sharing the camaraderie with their fellow man.”

 

Size Doesn’t Matter

So I watched this video, and was really stoked what they had to say about skateboarding. It was pretty cool to see a dude rip tranny and park, then rage some hills.

I actually had a similar experience one recent weekend, when I had the honor of getting an invite to go to a super top-secret bowl near the Delaware Water Gap in NJ. My friend Dave brought me and my buddy there, and since Dave has been a regular there almost every saturday since it opened, Allan — the owner of the bowl — was super stoked to see to fresh faces at his monstrosity of a skateboard structure.

We strolled into this joint, walked up the stairs, and nearly dropped a fat log in our pants when we saw the pool was measured at 15 feet in the deep end (with a 4 foot extension) and 8 feet in the “shallow” end. I was super stoked to skate this thing, super scared as well, but when I first laid eyes on it I had already come to terms with the shit eating that was inevitably about to go down.

I walked in, introduced myself to the very welcoming crew that was there and I went up to this dude, by the name of Clinton, who was rocking a dope ass Welcome Skateboards deck (if you love the brand as much as i do, and you see someone riding their decks, a super long conversation about how rad they are will ensue). As I was rambling about how cool his skateboard was and how rad their videos are (watch this one to get good idea of what Welcome is about). He said to me “So Dave told me you Longboard?”, and at that point I thought, “Fuck, I’ve been compromised,” so I smiled, laughed, and reluctantly said, “Yes.”

I expected a laugh or chuckle from this dude with killer style making a 15 foot bowl look like a fucking mini ramp, but instead, Clinton says to me ” I love longboarding! We should skate some hill after this!” Needless to say I was super amped that someone of that “shortboarding” ability was open to doing downhill and not afraid to profess his liking toward it.

P.S. Look forward to a Skate The East edit of this ridiculously burly bowl and the equally burly crew that calls it their stomping grounds.

Review: Loaded Boards Tesseract Review

Loaded Boards recently released the newest addition to their downhill and freeride lineup, the Tesseract. Drawing from lessons learned when developing two of their last major releases, the Tesseract blends some of our favorite features found in both the Chubby Unicorn and Kanthaka to create a super versatile and unbelievably fun board.

tesseract bottom

It’s got variable wheelbase options from 24.5” up to 26”. At the wider wheelbase option your kicks aren’t as functional for ollies, but they’ll still get the job done. It’s symmetrically shaped and features symmetrical rocker, dish-concave kicktails, flared wheel wells, gas pedals and W concave. Every time I look at it I can’t help but think it looks like the Kanthaka and Chubby Unicorn had a baby, and this is the beautiful result.

tesseract full viewThe Tesseract is a bamboo core sandwiched between two layers of fibreglass. Topping things off, quite literally, is a layer of cork. The cork is there to help dampen road vibrations and prevent damage to the graphic from spreading the same way a wood veneer usually does, as cork doesn’t scratch the same as other woods. While I have reservations about the use of cork since it can dry out and crumble, as many Birkenstock owners know, it really does work as a dampener. The board is incredibly light, yet super stable and agile at speed, something I almost wasn’t expecting since it’s so thin. The gas pedals are well placed and the wheel well flares make for some pockets that lock your feet in perfectly and allow you to know where you’re standing at all times. The W concave is much less aggressive than what we found on the Chubby Unicorn, making it more comfortable for longer sessions and long distance pushes.

I’ve also been able to pop fat ollies on this board, most of the time without even slapping the tail all the way to the ground. We’ve really been having a blast riding it, both for freeride and downhill and think it’s an extremely versatile board that will be a go-to in a lot of people’s quivers. It’ll be in in stores by the end of July, including our friends at MuirSkate, so check it out when you get a chance! Check out what else we had to say in the video review!

You can also scoop a fresh Tesseract deck with some fast shipping via Amazon:

Photos courtesy of Loaded Boards. 

Everything You Need to Know About Trucks: Part 1

Basic Overview:

Paris V2 43*'s on a Loaded Boards Tesseract

Paris V2 43* Trucks on a Loaded Boards Tesseract

Trucks are extremely important when it comes to downhill skateboarding. No one can tell you what trucks are the best or which are better for you. It happens to be one of those things, like many in this world, that is simply too subjective to be compared in a manner of one being better than the other. With that said, there is a lot that goes into a reverse kingpin truck, and although the topic of what truck is best may be subjective, there are obvious physical differences that cause trucks to respond in certain ways that may affect ones riding.

How They Work:

On a reverse kingpin truck there are four components: a baseplate, a hanger, a pivot point, and two bushings. The baseplate of the truck is attached to the board and leans in sync with the board as you change your weight distribution, causing the hanger to pivot over the bushings at the angle of the baseplates pivot point, which then allows the truck to turn. The factors that go into the turn of the truck are based on various factors.

Truck Tightness:

TRUCKS SHOULD ONLY BE RUN AT ONE TIGHTNESS. Tons of people out there try to change the turning of their trucks by tightening or loosening them.paris-43s Although this works, this is not the way they’re designed to change the turn of the truck. Trucks are designed to be tightened down to the point at which the hanger comes out of the pivot point of the baseplate at the angle of the baseplate. Having trucks too lose causes slop, which can be fun to mess with, but can also be extremely sketchy and increase your chance of speed wobbles heavily. Running trucks too tight causes bushings to deform, and eventually break down or blow out, trust me it sucks when your bushing breaks while you are riding, especially the bottom one. This also causes the hanger to run at a lower degree than the baseplate is designed for, destroying your pivot cup and giving a bad pivot point. Usually the ideal tightness is at the point just after loose slop has been removed, and no tighter. Stand next to your board and put weight on one of the rails, forcing the trucks to turn one direction. If your board returns to the center perfectly when you take your foot off the rail, then you know it’s tightened correctly.

Bushings:

The bushings of a truck are one of the key things that go into a truck’s turning ability. Changing bushing setups can make the same truck feel completely different and finding the right one is key. IMG_0187The characteristics that go into how a bushing responds are its durometer (hardness), shape, urethane type, kingpin tightness, washer setup, and placement as the top or bottom bushing.

Duro:

Bushings are made out of urathane and run on a durometer hardness scale typically between around 78a-96a. Basically it works like this: The lower the durometer, the softer the bushing, and there for the easier it is to make the truck turn. Some argue that there are ideal durometers for individual rider weight categories, and although these may be used as a decent guideline for what bushing hardness to get, these charts in no way represent what you should ride, for that is up to you.

Shapes:

bushings

There are a few various bushing shapes and even more have been coming out recently. In this article the three most widely used bushing shapes will be discussed, and these are: Eliminators, Barrels, and Cones. Barrels are the most common bushing shape, and for good reason. Barrel bushings allow for a distinct type of turning in which the trucks turn/lean ratio stays fairly consistent throughout the entire turn. This basically means that with barrel bushings if you lean on the board, it’ll turn proportionally to the amount of lean the rider gives in a fairly consistent manner. Barrels also provide a decent amount of rebound when diving into turns, or pumping. Coned bushings on the other hand have the most dive and do not allow for much rebound.IMG_0194[1] Cones are not common in fast riding and are more common in freestyle, dancing, commuting setups, as they lend themselves well to quick turns and agile movements. Eliminators are the widest of the bushings and therefore restrict turning the most out of the three shapes. With that being said, the turning is only restricted more than another bushing of the same duro. For instance, a 90a eliminator will be more restrictive than a 90a barrel, but may not be more restrictive than a 95a barrel. It is important to understand that eliminators are not designed to decrease turn, but to make the turning more progressive. Since there is more surface area contact between the hanger and the bushing in an eliminator setup, the turning becomes more progressive, rather than divey. In my opinion, eliminators feel comfortable when they are run at a durometer that is about 3a-5a less than your usual barrel setup. At low speeds eliminators do not turn much unless run extremely soft, but at speed they begin to become alive, feeling more like a barrel would at a lower speed.

Rebound:

The urethane formula has an effect on the turning of the bushing. Just like with wheels different urethane formulas of the same hardness may feel different. For example, an 87a Blood Orange bushing may feel softer than an 87a Venom bushing. Different companies have different urethane formulas and each formula has a unique feeling. One of the key components to the feeling of the urethane used is the rebound that is given from the bushing. Lots of rebound makes the truck want to turn back and pump, giving a lively feel. Low rebound gives a damper feeling turn. Rebound is not a good or bad thing and is once again something that is up for the individual rider to decide for themselves whether they like or not.

Washers:

The washers used in trucks are also a component that goes into how they respond. The two shapes for washers are flat and cupped. Washers are pretty simple, flat washers give less restrictive turn and less rebound and cupped washers give more restrictive turning and more rebound. Washers also come in various sizes, smaller washers being less restrictive. washersCupped washers are also an easy way to get rid of wheelbite if you don’t want to run risers and don’t mind sacrificing the turn.

Roadside vs Boardside:

Boardside and roadside bushings both have different roles in the trucks performance, and it is important to understand the difference. The bottom bushing (boardside) has more impact on the turning of the truck and its direct pivot, where as the top bushing (roadside) acts as a force to push back on the bottom bushing, and controls how easily the truck gives in or rebounds back. People typically run either the same durometer bushings all around, or a top bushing that is slightly softer than the bottom. It is also common to see people run an eliminator bushing on the bottom with a barrel bushing on the top, or a barrel bushing on the bottom with a cone bushing on the top.

boardside_roadside

Video: Yoke Crew and Creamer

Garrett Creamer traveled to the Mid-Atlantic to hook up with the Yoke Crew homies and go fast in Maryland. Fortunately for us they kept their cameras nearby and decided to pump out a little edit of their downhill adventures, dubbing it Yoke Crew: Downhill Division, you’ll quickly understand why.

Take a look and watch these fools shred some tasty mountain runs.

How To Not Blow A Spot

Clyde Man

Our buddy Clyde and the Massachusetts Skate, I mean State, Police.

Over the past few years, as this sport has continued to grow, it has become apparent that many of the newer generations of shredders do not follow the rules of the road, and therefore potentially blow the spot for themselves and others. If you have never had an interaction with a police officer or person of authority, you’re probably unaware that this sport is still frowned upon, even illegal in some areas, and have to always keep that fact in mind.

This means that when you’re skating a road, you gotta treat it like it’s your Granny’s house, that is, you gotta respect it.  People bash other people for stealing their spots all the time, but in reality, most spots are actually pretty easy to find if you know what you’re doing.  So those groms that you didn’t want to find that dope spot you had, they’re gonna find out about it, and when they do, it’s in everyone’s best interest that they know how to respect it.  No one owns any one spot, everyone wants to progress, and there are only so many dope runs in a given area, so chances are as the sport grows, your favorite runs will be skated by others. Many things go into properly respecting a road, and all roads are different, but there are some general rules that should be followed.

“This means that when you’re skating a road, you gotta treat it like it’s your Granny’s house, that is, you gotta respect it.”

First off, it all depends on the spot you’re shredding since all spots are different.  If you’re at your local freeride hill and you got all the neighbors you know and you’re comfortable, then it’s usually ok to post up and hang out, shredding the hill for an extended period of time.  On hills that are like this, you gotta respect neighbors’ opinions, as well as yield to any traffic.  You also can’t leave the hill a mess, leave it in better condition than you found it, don’t leave your water bottle and lunch bags, those weren’t there when you got there, were they?  Another thing to consider is acting sketchy.  Eddie HaskellMad kids act sketchy when they are dealing with adults, because they don’t know the vibe yet and are uncomfortable with the interaction.  When you see someoneacting nice and polite, you are bound to judge them a bit different than if they are acting all sketchy not saying hi, avoiding interaction, or being obnoxious.  When neighbors, locals, and old people are walking by observing you skating, wave, smile, and say hi. Take a second to talk to them, usually they dig it, and usually it will help you in keeping your spot from being blown.  When it comes to traffic in neighborhood runs, just yield and show that you’re in control. Even if you have the control to setup carve into the opposite lane and throw a little backside check in front of that oncoming car, it looks mad sketchy to that car and almost any other random civilian watching.  I always see people continuing their run with a car behind them on their tail, or with a car pulling out of a driveway, or an oncoming car.  If you just come to a stop and wait 5 seconds, it decreases your chances of having the cops called on you.

Another thing to consider, and this is for all types of spots, is that the more people you have with you, the higher the chance that your sess is gonna get blown.  I sometimes see grom crews that are about 30 strong all ripping the same hill – an easy way to quickly blow a good spot.  When skating runs that involve blind turns, always spot the turn, and don’t just spot it, know that you can hit it in the worst situation, know that when that school bus is stuck in his 5 point turn, that you can come to a stop.

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Man Defends Himself Against Cougar with Longboard

You can the title as many times as you’d like, but your eyes aren’t fooling you. While walking along a wooded path (what we’d call a trail out here, by the sounds of it) in Banff National Park in Alberta, Canada, a man was suddenly attacked by a large cougar while listening to music through his headphones. cougarvslongboardHe was hit from behind with enough force to knock him to the ground, fortunately for him his quick thinking lead him to elbow the cougar in the face before using his longboard to stun it and escape unscathed.

Officials from the park say that attacks of this nature are extremely rare, as cougars are relatively shy, wary animals who tend to avoid human contact. This means that the cougar is either very young and doesn’t yet know how to hunt, or is in some sort of dire straights and is going for the easiest prey possible — either scenario isn’t good.

What can you do to avoid getting attacked yourself? Carry some bear mace, making noise, and walking in pairs or groups while also avoiding dawn and dusk are your best bets for steering clear of any trouble.

While this took place far away from the east coast and not directly related to skating, it’s a good reminder that you should always be aware of your surroundings, and make sure friends or family know where you’re going if you’re alone. It’s a best practice to skate, hike, etc. with a buddy in case anything ever happens, but when you can’t find anyone you should at least leave a note or shoot someone a message. We’re not the only creatures in the great outdoors, and it seems like after Buffalo Bill Downhill and this incident, animals are becoming even more and more curious about skating.

Stay safe out there.

 

(via the National Post)

Video: Moose Jones

Got this video submitted in and just had to post it.   Moose shreds with a passion and creativity that you don’t see in most younger shredders, while many groms worry about how long they can stand up slide, Moose is out there just having fun.  In this edit watch him style through the neighborhoods of upper northwest Washington DC.

Wrap-Up: 2013 Ithaca Hill Jam

The 2013 Comet Skateboards Ithaca Hill Jam (a.k.a. Ithaca Skate Jam, a.k.a. Ithaca Slide Jam) went down on Saturday April 27th in Ithaca, New York with over 160 registered riders and close to 250 people total attending.

View of all the action.

View of all the action.

To say the event was a success would be one of the understatements of the year, as it proved to be one of the the best non-race events hosted on the east coast ever, and raised the bar for what’s to be expected in the future.

By the time we parked and got to the race it was about 9:15AM, the bottom section below the funbox, was full of skaters warming up as the Comet crew on the top half of the hill were putting the finishing touches on the ramp setup. Everything came together and people started skating the entire hill by 10:00AM/10:15AM; from that point forward it was ON! Once people warmed up and got a feeling for the ramps and the pavement things escalated quickly, with everyone clearly feeding off the energy from the crowd and other skaters.

Comet team rider and Toronto native Eric Jensen was really working the hip and launch ramp all day. So gnarly. Ithaca Skate Jam 2013.

Comet team rider and Toronto native Eric Jensen was really working the hip and launch ramp all day.

The entire Comet team was in attendance, including our good friend Brian Peck, Liam Morgan, Jesse Breiman, Anthony Flis, Big Dave, Jared Henry, Eric Jensen and a slew of other well known shredders like MuirSkate owner Scott “El Beasto” Lembach, Eric Roth, Ed Garner, Josh Wright, and too many more to name.

The top half of the hill was definitely where most of the action was centered around as they contained the majority of ramps and features. A spine/rail jam along with two hips, two smaller kickers, and a launch ramp made for an exciting and fun downhill skatepark that pushed people to go bigger and be more creative than usual. Below that a fun box stayed chillin with most choosing to avoid it after watching at least one person launch over the entire feature straight to flat ground, instead of the landing ramp.

Brian Peck and Skate The East's Mike DiPietro getting some follow run footage.

Brian Peck and Skate The East’s Mike DiPietro getting some follow run footage.

Those that chose to keep 4 wheels on the ground found plenty of room to get sideways and go big, without getting snaked too many times. It was hella dope to see hardwheel shredders like Steve Kong going faster and bigger than I’d ever imagined, taking full advantage of the closed road and 13.5% grade.

The photos and videos speak for themselves and tell the story better than I can. The vibe was great, the weather was perfect, and the city of Ithaca was a real sport by letting a bunch of skaters shut down a road and play for a day. So many props and thanks go to Comet Skateboards for putting together such an unreal event and raising the bar for what’s to be expected at east coast events in the future. People pushed themselves hard, got pitted, and showed just how motivated the east coast scene is these days. I’m so stoked to see how the rest of this season will turn out, as I think this is just the tip of the proverbial talent iceberg out east.

Brian Peck pops an ollie, starts sweatin' uhhh.