Earthwing N.L.S.: New Deck Technology and Lineup

I got an e-mail from Earthwing head honcho Brian Petrie giving me the scoop on a new technology and deck line they’re dropping, dubbed N.L.S. (Next Level Shit).

Earthwing N.L.S. 37 and 40

Earthwing N.L.S. 37 and 40

Earthwing N.L.S. decks are made using a crush-welding processes that presses each deck individually (many decks are pressed en masse) in an aluminum mold under heat and pressure. There’s no glue involved and the bond formed is  stronger than the core material itself,  so delams are said to be a thing of the past. The core is then pressed in between layers of what Earthwing calls Unbeleivium, a rigid fibrous material that adds “unusually stiff torsional support” to the deck. What’s all this mean? It means that you get a deck with a 4 ply core that’s just as stiff as a 9 ply deck. Less weight but the same stiffness is better for your skateboarding.

Earthwing N.L.S. 40 holding 96oz of water.

Earthwing N.L.S. 40 holding 96oz of water.

The decks will also feature 360 degree concave that essentially forms a giant bowl on the deck. Brian said they were able to fill one with 96oz of water and sent a picture to prove it. Not the first time we’ve seen ‘cereal bowl concave’ if I remember correctly, but impressive stuff none the less. An added bonus? It’s all made here in the USA and is clean, green and recyclable.

The first two decks featuring the new technology will be the Earthwing N.L.S. 40 and N.L.S. 37. They’re describing the 40 as a symmetrical free ride/park deck while the 37 is a directional speed board with a functional kick tail. Full stats and dimensions are below.

If you want to get your hands on one of these bad boys they’ll be available worldwide in just a few days, on March 1st 2014.

N.L.S. 40 N.L.S. 37
Dimensions 40″ x 10″ 37″ x 9.875″
Wheelbase 20 13/16″ – 24″ 20 13/16″ – 24″
Nose 4 5/8″ – 7 1/8″ 1 1/2″ – 4″
Tail 4 5/8″ – 7 1/8″ 4 5/8″ – 7 1/8″

Earthwing N.L.S. Concave

18-Year Old Skater Killed in NYC

Some tragic news came out of New York City on Thursday afternoon, just over two weeks before thousands of skaters plan on descending upon the city to skate in the Broadway Bomb. 18-year old skater Alexander Ciszewski was killed after being run over by a truck while skateboarding home from school Thursday afternoon in Queens, after losing control of his board while skitching.

18-Year Old Skater Killed in NYC - 2005 GMC Box Truck

One type of 2005 GMC box truck.

Police say Ciszewski was holding the passenger side of a white 2005 GMC box truck (e.g. a U-Haul or Ryder type truck), skitching a ride, on 47th Avenue near 32nd Place in Sunnyside when he lost control and fell backwards, being run over by the truck’s back wheels.

One witness, Jadon Thompson, told the New York Post that “I know [the truck driver] probably saw the guy. He sped up about five miles per hour either to get the kid to let go, or to give him a faster ride.”

Thompson was the first to respond to the scene and called 911, where he found Ciszewski face down and gasping for air intermittently. Ciszewski was rushed to nearby Elmhurst Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, according to DNAinfo NYC.

The driver didn’t stop immediately, leaving the scene of the crash, although Gothamist reports that the driver came back to the scene about 20 minutes later. Police say it remains unclear if the driver knew the teen had fallen and been run over, and are investigating whether or not a crime was committed.

The news is tragic, but also serves as a poignant reminder that skitching, especially on the sides of vehicles, is incredibly dangerous. When the driver isn’t fully aware that you’re there, and/or isn’t in communication with you, the risk is exponentially higher.

Accidents happen when you least expect them, so skate safe and skate smart everyone.

Photo via


What Do You Think About Wheel Shields?

Wheel Shields inventor Chase KaczmarekHave you heard about Wheel Shields yet? They’re a new product seeking funding on Kickstarter, designed and invented by east coaster and Maryland resident, Chase Kaczmarek. While I was a skeptic at first, after a little more reading and research I think Wheel Shields might end up on at least one of my set-ups.

Evolution of Wheel Shields

Wheel Shields have evolved a lot from their first inception and were designed to solve 4 main problems in longboarding as I see it: wheel bite, shoe bite, wheel locking, and spray/splashes off your wheels when riding in the rain. Chase also says Wheel Shields will help extend the life of your bearings, and allow you to invent new tricks, although I’m not sure how many people will be down to try standing on their wheels…just in case…

Wheel Shields designs

While I’m not sure how aero the Wheel Shields are for your downhill setups, Wheel Shields were designed to fit almost every wheel under 76mm, even meaty mothers like Biggie Hawgs. I asked Chase what size contact patches work with Wheel Shields, what he told me was that instead of contact patch size, what matters is the distance from the bearing and the outer lip of the wheel, which must be less than 1″. Despite this, he said almost every wheel they’ve tested fit.  The concept of preventing wheel lockups while downhilling in a tight pack is definitely appealing as well, as anyone who has ever experienced it can attest to how shitty of an experience it is.

I’d definitely like to see these in person and give them a try myself, especially on my commuter board, as I’m sick of riding on wet pavement and getting soaked from the spray off my wheels. I’m also excited to be able to help support Chase a little and support an east coast invention at the same time, hopefully you might as well! Give them a look over on Kickstarter to learn a little more. They’ve got 6 days and $6,500 to raise, think they can do it?! What are your thoughts on Wheel Shields, sound off in the comments section below!

Man Defends Himself Against Cougar with Longboard

You can the title as many times as you’d like, but your eyes aren’t fooling you. While walking along a wooded path (what we’d call a trail out here, by the sounds of it) in Banff National Park in Alberta, Canada, a man was suddenly attacked by a large cougar while listening to music through his headphones. cougarvslongboardHe was hit from behind with enough force to knock him to the ground, fortunately for him his quick thinking lead him to elbow the cougar in the face before using his longboard to stun it and escape unscathed.

Officials from the park say that attacks of this nature are extremely rare, as cougars are relatively shy, wary animals who tend to avoid human contact. This means that the cougar is either very young and doesn’t yet know how to hunt, or is in some sort of dire straights and is going for the easiest prey possible — either scenario isn’t good.

What can you do to avoid getting attacked yourself? Carry some bear mace, making noise, and walking in pairs or groups while also avoiding dawn and dusk are your best bets for steering clear of any trouble.

While this took place far away from the east coast and not directly related to skating, it’s a good reminder that you should always be aware of your surroundings, and make sure friends or family know where you’re going if you’re alone. It’s a best practice to skate, hike, etc. with a buddy in case anything ever happens, but when you can’t find anyone you should at least leave a note or shoot someone a message. We’re not the only creatures in the great outdoors, and it seems like after Buffalo Bill Downhill and this incident, animals are becoming even more and more curious about skating.

Stay safe out there.


(via the National Post)

Skate The East Welcomes Tom Leary

We’ve been working hard on building a team of writers to bring you guys the best content possible surrounding the east coast longboarding scene, and are stoked to announce another awesome addition to the staff, Tom Leary.

Best known for his kickass filming and editing skills, Tom is one of the rising stars in New England and by far one of the gnarliest kids on and off the hill I know. He’s also quickly making a name for himself in front of the camera — riding for Nelson Longboards and Tiger Design Wheel Co. — with some of the smoothest and steezy switch toesides I’ve seen in a minute. He’s got some great insight on where the sport is, and where he thinks it’ll be going, as well as an impecable eye when it comes to videos. Tom will touch base on a variety of topics in his posts and will be a driving force behind some of our coming interviews with east coast riders. We’re hoping we can convince him to chef up a few videos for your viewing pleasure, too.

We’re super stoked to have him on board, help us give him a warm welcome and share the news with your friends with a Like or Tweet!


Bustin’ Boards Announces 2013 Lineup

As the weather gets nicer it’s hard to not get excited for the season to start, and the new product releases we’ve been seeing aren’t making it much easier. Bustin’ today announced their 2013 lineup with major additions to their Yoface, Maestro, and Camber families and a new freeride wheel family dubbed the Five-O Series.


The Yoface family picture.

We’ll start where people seem to be most excited: the new Yoface models. The Yoface 35 became a smash hit amongst DK enthusiasts after its release last year and the team over at Bustin’ didn’t waste much time working to improve it’s design and functionality even more. Featuring a beautiful cereal bowl concave that maintains its shape right to the tails and flared wheel wells, you can now find the Yoface in two additional lengths: a shorter 32″ version for a more street-deck feel at 8.675″ wide, or a longer 39″ version for added foot platform and deck real estate when going fast at 9.5″ wide. These boards transition seamlessly from city streets with big wheels, to shredding bowls and bombing hills. The graphic on the Yoface 39 is my favorite yet from Bustin’, too dope. You can pick up the Yoface 32 for $70, Yoface 35 for $75, and the Yoface 39 for $95 at your favorite local skateshop that carries Bustin’.


The new Yoface 39


Maestro Mini V2

While there’s been an added focus on their DH/freeride decks and the Yoface, Bustin’ has managed to stay true to their roots and are making changes to two of their classic board families: the Maestro and Camber Series. This year they’re making big changes to the MaestroPro in an attempt to make the classic city commuter into a more formidable freeride option as well as introducing version 2 of the Maestro Mini.  Both the MaestroPro and Maestro Mini V2 feature symmetrical shapes, unlike the forward cambered design of the Maestro Classic, so you can jump on and rip them without thinking about which direction the deck is facing.

The MaestroPro is constructed using 6 plies of maple and sublimated triaxial fiberglass to add stiffness without the excess weight caused by more wood. It features a rockered shape, cambered foot platform, and signature low ride to make it ultra comfortable when commuting, and multiple wheelbase options to help you adjust the amount of flex the board gives. The Maestro Mini V2 features many of the same upgrades that the MaestroPro got, with the exception of the sublimated triaxial fiberglass, instead using the same 8 ply Maple construction found on the Maestro Classic. With its squat shape the Maestro Mini V2 has some fatter kicktails and should make commuting a blast as it looks like you can really manhandle this board without much effort. The MaestroPro comes in at 38″ long and 9″ wide, while the Maestro Mini V2 stands at 34″ long and 8.75″ wide. Despite only being 4″ shorter in length, the Maestro Mini V2’s wheelbase is almost 6″ shorter than the MaestroPro and should be super agile for navigating on city streets or campus sidewalks. The MaestroPro will set you back $175 and the Maestro Mini V2 will put you back $95.


The MaestroPro

The Camber Series, comprised of the Cigar 38 and Cigar 31, got some upgrades this year as well. A variation of a classic flexy pintail, these topmount decks are great for casual spring and summertime cruises. Gentle concave mixed with gentle camber and a flexy platform make for a great pumping/push deck to allow you to cruise without much effort or foot fatigue. Multiple wheelbase options allow you to dial in how much flex you need and feature CNC’ed wheel wells. Simple and straightforward cruiser decks, nothing too complicated here. Both are available now for $95 and $80 for the Cigar 38 and 31 respectively.

five-o wheels lineup

Finally, Bustin’ released their new freeride wheel for 2013, the Five-O Series, in two different versions: 64mm with a centerset core, and 72mm with a sideset core. The translucent wheels (which we have to imagine leaves some gnarly thane lines) feature a small core to maximize thane depth and minimize the chance of a core blow-out and are made to be ridden hard. Bustin’ is advertising them as a no bullish*t wheel, just pure thane that slides consistently and predictably without the need for any frills, a refreshing and exciting take on wheels.  The 64mm version comes in 80a and 85a durometers while the 72mm version can be found in 77a ad 80a. The 64mm wheels were designed as an all around wheel with the Yoface in mind, while the 72mm version were designed specifically to be ridden fast on hills as a freeride wheel, hence the sideset core and bigger size. Whenever I hear a wheel described as “crayon on construction paper” I get very excited, so expect a first-hand look at these wheels in the near future.

That’s it for now. We’re psyched to see our friends in NYC doing some big things and continuing to push the sport forward on all fronts. It’s nice to know that while Bustin’ has been focusing on the freeride/downhill scene recently, they haven’t lost sight of their roots in the City and are producing boards for all types of riders, from park skaters to the city commuter and out to the hills. I’m excited to see the new Yoface and Five-O wheels in person soon and will be sure to report back when we do.

SkateThe604 Previews the New 2013 Landyachtz Top Speed

2013TopSpeed5Landyachtz is going to have a big year ahead of them and we’re super excited. The 2013 WolfShark looks like it’ll be the best version of the beloved directional top mount we’ve seen yet and the rest of of the line-up is starting to flesh itself out slowly. SkateThe604 recently posted a whole bunch of pictures and information about the newest board to show it’s skin, the Top Speed, on their Facebook Page.

After about 8 months of design and prototyping the final version of the Top Speed sure is something to take a look at. The bottom of the board will feature a ply of fiberglass with sublimated graphics, in keeping with what we saw on the 2013 WolfShark (and apparently what we’ll see on most of the 2013 decks), which will add some stiffness without the need for extra weight. The graphic, in my opinion, is one of the cooler ones I’ve seen in a while, and is drastically different from the Landy graphics we’ve become used to.


The length of the deck comes in at 34.5″ long and 9″ wide with a 25.5″ wheelbase and “W” concave. The Top Speed also features some subtle wheel-well flares that we haven’t seen on a Landy board before. They look like they rise nicely out of the concave and should create a nice pocket when mixed with the W, something I’m curious to see for myself. Since I haven’t even seen this deck in person yet, you’ll have to differ to what SkateThe604 has to say about the size and shape, although it sounds like welcome news for you smaller riders out there and very comfortable.

For shorter people with small feet like me, this board was designed for you. What I most like about the specs is the width; traditionally boards are 10” wide. I have small feet so I could never really freeride 10” boards since I like to have a bit of heel hang. With the steadily rising of new groms coming into the longboard scene this will be a well suited board … The newest features to this year are the flairs. I find the flairs on this board is just perfect, it really locks your foot in, really nice to push your foot up against. I’ve ridden many other boards with flairs or flair like features but found them to always be too aggressive.


Tip of the hat again to SkateThe604 for the scoop, we’re excited to get a chance to see this thing in person soon enough.



Skate The East Welcomes Molly Lewis!

Once again the title doesn’t leave much to the imagination on this one so we’ll cut to the chase: we’re super stoked to welcome Molly Lewis as our newest author here at Skate The East! For those of you who don’t know Molly you’ll soon be very familiar, not only because you’ll be hearing more from her here, but also because she’s easily one of the most talented ladies in the sport right now.

Hailing from North Carolina, Molly rides for Original Skateboards, Holesom Pucks, Socco Socks, Aussie Island Skate Shop and reps the east coast wherever she goes. We’re looking forward to hearing more about her numerous skate trips and thoughts in general and think she’ll be a perfect addition to the crew here! She’ll tell you a little more about herself in an intro post soon; until then join us in giving a big warm welcome to Molly!

Check out Molly taking the podium after winning the Ladies’ Freeride competition at the 3rd Annual Central Mass event.



Skate The East Welcomes Jake Wade!

Since the title doesn’t leave much to the imagination we’ll just come out and say it, we want to give a warm welcome to our buddy Jake Wade, who will be joining our editorial team. Jake’s primary responsibility will be to rejuvenate our long-slacking Events coverage, making sure you know when events on the east are coming up and the details you need.

Jake is one of the gnarliest shredders we have up here in the Northeast, and has made quite a name for himself with his channel on YouTube as part of Team Tangy. You’ve also seen him in various edits on our YouTube account and most recently at the end of our Loaded Chubby Unicorn review.

We’re super super stoked to have him as part of the staff and can’t wait to start bringing you the details of events that are coming up this season!



So the question now becomes, how do you get an event your planning posted to Skate The East? Simple, hit up Jake’s “work e-mail” at and include:

  • Names of the people hosting the event
  • Facebook event link or website
  • Location, date, and time
  • Entry fee and registration details
  • Whether it’s outlaw or sanctioned
  • Any other details. Parking, any other instructions you might have, etc.
  • Way so that we can contact you in case we have questions (won’t be posted unless it’s also for registration details)
  • .PNG or .JPG of your event’s flyer.

Unfortunately, if you don’t have all of these details in your e-mail, don’t expect the event to get posted.