Video: Another Reason to Spot Corners

If you don’t want to get familiar with the grill of an oncoming car, it’s good habit to spot blind corners, especially when the road is sandy enough to make your shutdown slides much longer than expected. Unfortunately we didn’t heed our own advice the other day, causing Noah Davis and Jake Wade to play a quick game of chicken with a Lincoln Navigator. Luckily everyone was fine, the driver stopped in time and Noah shut down (and fell) before the situation got too hairy, but it’s a sobering reminder of what could have been.

Spot corners and listen to your ears, if you think it’s a car coming it’s best just to wait and find out for sure.

A Loaded February: New Loaded and Orangatang Products

With their two huge product releases around the holidays last year we expected things to be quiet at Loaded until just before the 2013 season kicked into full gear, if at all this year.cooking_morongas Instead, the guys in sunny southern California decided to hit us with another 1-2 product release punch by first dropping the new Orangatang freeride wheel, named the Moronga, and following it up last week with the announcement of their new Advanced Freeride Glove.

Last winter Orangatang made waves by announcing their first centerset freeride wheel, the Balut. With their big, centerset, and exposed spoked core, new urethane formula, and unique size, the Baluts were extremely different from Orangatang’s established line-up and quickly became a favorite freeride wheel for many. As riders began using the Baluts for much faster speeds and bigger slides than originally imagined, Otang started taking note of what was and wasn’t working and went right back to the kitchen to cook something new up. The result is their new freeride wheel, dubbed the Moronga. The Morongas are using the same urethane introduced with the Baluts, known as Euphorethane, and feature a completely symmetrical shape and centerset bearing seat, meaning you can flip them any which way to ensure an even wear. They feature a narrow 35mm contact patch and the same 72.5mm height found on the Balut, making them very easy to break into a slide and predictable the entire way through. morongas_on_chubbyThey are built on the same core as the Balut, making them lightweight while ensuring a long and even wear, but addressed the issue of cores popping out of the wheels by pouring urethane all the way around the core (see update below). This also allowed for what may be the biggest change with the Morongas: the new lip profile. Much sharper and more defined than the Balut lip, Orangatang took extra care to ensure that the lip profile is maintained through the life of the entire wheel. This is accomplished in the way that the lip blends back down and into the bearing seat and is something we’ll explain more in depth in our upcoming first look and review. I’m excited to get to know them a little more and report back on what we think in the near future. You can find them at shops all over for around $55.

UPDATE: I actually got a chance to clarify this point with Kyle Chin over at Loaded. The reality is, while there has been lots of talk about cores popping out on the Baluts, there have only actually been a few recorded cases. As it goes, the internet tends to make things a bit more extreme. The real reason for the redesign was to create for the new lip profile and size when approaching a DH/freeride wheel.

me_MtTom_morongas

With the both Chubby Unicorn and Moronga releases it’s clear that Loaded is focused on upping their freeride game, something they reaffirmed yet again with their announcement of the Advanced Freeride Gloves. Gloves are a piece of gear that rarely get much love, but can make a difference in how comfortable you are on the hill and how confident you feel when putting a hand down. Loaded currently makes two glove options, the Freeride Glove and their Race Glove. The Freeride Glove is my personal favorite glove for any discipline of skating. I’ve rocked the last two versions of them and haven’t been able to find another glove that can match the breathability and support. Their main issue, however, is due to the fact that they’re almost all cloth. Because of this they’re susceptible to much more wear and tear from accidentally putting fingers down, crashes, and grip tape than leather alternatives. The Race Glove is a much beefier alternative that features a leather construction and carbon fibre knuckle protection. They look nice and provide the protection you want when going fast in an unpredictable downhill environment, but don’t breath very well for the casual rider on the hill for extended periods of time. loaded_AFG_pictureEnter the Advanced Freeride Gloves (AFGs). Designed as a middle-ground between the two gloves, the AFGs are made of premium leather and feature a Coolmax Fabric lining which wicks sweat away from your skin to keep your hands drier and cooler than they would be otherwise. They also have a fair-sized mesh patch on the back of the hand to allow for added ventilation. They’ve also got some additional padding not found in the Freeride Gloves, especially over the knuckles, for those unpredictable moments that you find yourself pulling a Superman through the air with no clear idea of how you’ll be landing. To top it all off these gloves actually look really sharp (and we all know style points increase your skating ability more than anything else, so make sure your swagger is right). They’re retailing for $68.00 and will be available through retailers on Tuesday, February 26th.

Dane Webber, photo credit to Loaded.

Loaded Chubby Unicorn Review

If you haven’t done so already head over and take a look at our first thoughts on the Chubby Unicorn. Instead of doing what I usually do in reviews, this post is going to compliment what was already said in our first thoughts, as well as what we talk about in the video review.

Side view of the Chubby Unicorn and its urethane rails.

As we said in the first post as well as the video review, the Chubby Unicorn is SUPER comfortable. The fat W concave mixed with integrated wheel wells create comfortable well formed pockets to lock your feet in during slides, and encourage good form while tucking. The thing I really like about the concave on the Chubby Unicorn is that I don’t need to move my back foot at all. At 9.75″ wide I’m able to keep my toes on the front rail and heels hanging off the back, making both the W accessible for toeside slides and rails accessible for heeslide slides without you having to shuffle your feet at all. The thing I can’t stress enough, however, is that despite the W being so aggressive, it doesn’t diminish the feeling of the rails like we’ve seen on other boards. This means you really do feel locked in no matter what you’re doing on it. I’m a big fan of rocker when it’s done well. The Chubby Unicorn’s rocker is subtle enough that you’ll forget it’s there, but functional enough to add to that stable, locked in feeling. One thing that I was pumped to learn was that the recessed wheel wells are angled so that the rocker doesn’t affect the angle of your trucks, meaning your 50* trucks stay 50*. Another big thing we liked was that the concave runs through the kicktails. This allows you to know where you are on the kicks without looking and keep your feet where you want them.

Jake gets steezy on the Chubby Unicorn in this still from our video review

Downhill on the Chubby Unicorn feels great. I expected it to feel a little too long to go fast on, but quickly adjusted my tuck and soon found myself more comfortable on the Chubby Unicorn than any other board in my downhill quiver. As I mentioned above, the pockets created by the wheel wells and W encourage good posture when tucking. As Henry mentioned in the video, the pocket created in the front allows you to angle your foot slightly forward, and the fat W concave gives your back foot a pocket to fit securely into, between the rail and W. The board is still agile and easily controlled despite it’s length, thanks to the 28.25″ wheelbase. While there is some dampening to remove some of the road vibrations, I wouldn’t say the board really has any “flex,” like you’ve come to expect from Loaded Boards. The thing really is quite stiff, even when standing in the middle, which helps make it feel even more stable at speed. Jake was able to rip down straightaways and still throw technical enough slides to get around a set of hairpins at one of the gnarlier downhill spots here in Connecticut, putting it through it’s downhill paces where it performed with flying colors.

The construction quality on the Chubby Unicorn is unparalleled to any board we’ve seen yet. Despite the complex design and new construction techniques, the board feels more sturdy than any “classic” board I’ve ever used. So far it’s holding up much better than I expected, as well. To be honest, I figured that with ollies, high-speed curbbing accidents, and collateral damage from failed putt tricks there would quickly be problems with the UHMWPE and urethane rails: I was wrong. The urethane that Loaded developed along with Orangatang is HARD. I mean really hard. I’ve been able to scuff it and scratch it a little, but it’s not chipping, peeling, or delaminating at all. I’m super stoked. It’s still too early to really tell how the UHMWPE bottom will hold up and when it will show signs of wear, but so far it’s just as we’d expect and have seen minimal wear and tear from ollies. Another thing to be noted is that the urethane runs about 1/2 inch from the edge of the board on the sides and about a full inch or more on the tails to ensure that you won’t run into delam issues and ensure that your pop stays fresh for a long time, even if you start to wear through the first parts of the UHMWPE.

UHMWPU bottom with a fresh Skate the East sticker on it.

One thing I’m super keen on is the fact that between the UHMWPE bottom and urethane rails this board is sealed to be waterproof. That means you won’t have to worry about it getting waterlogged if happen to be skating through the wet. I’m very impressed with how well Loaded did in putting this board together. It feels sturdy and really shows the attention to detail that Loaded paid to the small things, it really did beat my expectations. I think it’d be super cool if you could send the board back to be re-coated with the UHMWPE or urethane if something did eventually happen to them, to extend the life of the board. You can get your skis and snowboard resurfaced and re-railed, why not your longboard too? I think it’ll be interesting to see if Loaded ever offers anything of the sort since these boards are definitely meant to last a long, long time.

So, is there anything we didn’t like about the Chubby Unicorn? To be honest, not much. While I’ve gotten used to the length of the board, I wouldn’t mind seeing a shorter version with an even shorter wheelbase to allow you to ride over the trucks, instead of behind them — something I’ve heard from a few other people, as well. I also don’t think this board shines as a commuter. While the kicktails make it a bit more practical, the length of the board makes it a bit cumbersome to carry around in and out of stores, buildings, crowds, etc. I also had trouble finding the perfect foot position when pushing because of how big and aggressive the W concave was. That being said, the board was meant to go down hills and get sideways, so it’s understandable, although a bit out of character for Loaded.

Overall, though, Loaded really took their time in thinking the board out and creating one of the best constructed, highest quality pieces of longboarding gear we’ve seen yet. The Chubby Unicorn will surely be a game changer and will force a lot of the competition to think further outside the box and push board design even further. I also think we’ll see some of the innovative features found on the Chubby Unicorn find their way into new shapes and sizes both from Loaded and the competition as time goes on. Things like urethane rails and UHMWPE will become standard features for many boards in the near future due to their functionality and value added.

Check out the video review below and make sure you watch it all the way through to see Henry Lancaster-Goguen and Jake Wade put the Chubby Unicorn through a much needed workout.

Stats:
Name: Chubby Unicorn
Length: 42.25”
Width: 9.75”
Wheelbase: 28.25”
Kick length: 7” (tip to inner bolt)
Weight: 4.9 lbs

Head over to their website to read the full story of the development and naming of the board, and all the specs and features. Make sure you’re our fan on Facebook, follow us on Twitter and Instagram, and subscribe on YouTube to stay current with everything that doesn’t make it to the blog, too!

Video: SZ Playday

If you’re following along with our Facebook Page (which you should be by now) you’ll remember that I posted an update earlier saying that we had perfect conditions up here in New England and were off to take downhill runs and footage, an endeavor that proved very successful.After our visit to the Surf-Rodz shop this past week Lauren and I were super stoked about everything Wayne and his crew are doing and called our good friend Henry in for a good ole Surf-Rodz downhill session. Just like I promised I got right to work on editing when I got home and cranked out a fun little downhill video featuring Lauren Suchocki, Henry Lancaster-Goguen, and myself.

Setups:

Henry: Eden Racing Maple Sparrow w/ ABEC 11 75mm Big Zigs on 10mm 45* Surf-Rodz RKPs
Mike: TR Custom Longboards Blitz w/ Orangatang  70mm 80a 4Presidents on 10mm 45* Surf-Rodz RKPs
Lauren: Rayne Baby Killer w/ Orangatang  70mm 80a 4Presidents on 8mm 45* Surf-Rodz RKPs

Happy Balut Day!

Many of you have been drooling over pictures and asking questions about Orangatang’s newest wheel line, the Balut, since they first announced them and again when we posted our first few pictures of them. Well folks, drool no more because as of today you’ll be able to finally get your hands on a set of these magical new wheels from Californ-i-a. Many good things are being said about these wheels, and not just from me, either. Norman Plante, Ben DeSnyder, Mike Girard, Paul Kent, Jonathan Douglass, and many, many more have all said unreal things about these new wheel, once you ride a set for a few sessions you’ll quickly understand why.

So, since Norm and Ben decided to release a little East Coast warm winter video celebrating the release of these puppies we felt we had to pass it along. Enjoy.

P.S. Don’t forget to enter for a chance to win one of our unreleased stickers!

Video: Mike Girard Brings Some East Coast Swagger to Europe

At this point I don’t think it’s a secret that we like what Mike Girard does on a skateboard and the videos he produces. He’s almost constantly producing new edits showcasing him and friends (such as Norman Plant, Eric Roth, and Graham Fedderson) throwing down hard and repping Central MA like no one else. Mike traveled abroad to study in Dijon, France for the spring of his junior year at Colgate University where it appears he not only kept his head in the books, but his feet on his skateboards as well. Released in two parts Mike edited more than 15 minutes of footage showcasing some awesome and mouthwatering downhill runs, juicy freeride and downhill freeride spots and some great freestyle moves. Part II isn’t just freestyle, or dancing, however, as Mike also got some great shots ditch skating in what looks to be one of the more spots I’ve ever seen.

While Spain might be getting most of the attention when it comes to longboarding in Europe, Girard did a great job showing that France has some rising stars and unreal runs.

Review: 80a Stimulus wheels by Orangatang

Ladies and gentlemen, with the New Year upon us Skate The East is also trying to ramp it up for 2012. I know I’ve said thank you many times before, so I’ll refrain from rehashing too much of what I’ve said so many times, but your support really does mean so much, so thank you. 2012 is going to be a big year, and as we race towards our first birthday we’re going to continue to produce quality content and expand our offerings even further. You might have noticed some increased activity on our YouTube account lately, I’m learning a lot about filming and editing and promise you’ll see some very very cool videos soon! We’ve also been promising more reviews and wait no longer, I’ve got a whole slate of them lined up for 2012 so you can expect new reviews pretty frequently! Enough talk about Skate The East, though,  let’s jump right into it…

Rider stats & setup: 5’11 190lbs; TR Custom Blitz w/ 176mm Surf-Rodz 45* RKPs & 10mm Surf-Rodz bearings

The Orange Orangatang 80a Stimulus wheel is a 70mm offset wheel with a 42mm contact patch. Like its big brother, the Durians, the offset core creates a nice rounded lip that gives the wheel a little more grip through corners than you find with most centerset freeride wheels. Since they’re one of Orangatang’s freeride wheels they’re stone ground when you get them, making them easier to slide out of the box and break in without having to wear the mold-release off. These are the softest urethane wheel that Orangatang offers and are advertised as “buttery and cushy.”

I can’t lie, I really didn’t know what to expect when I first got these wheels. Owning a set of the 86a Durians that never seemed to play nice with our East Coast pavement I had my doubts about the 80a thane starting out. With much of the negative feedback surrounding the wheels having to do with bullsh*t skater politics and less to do with how the wheels actually ride, I had to get a set and see for myself to see if the haters had solid ground to stand on, or if it was all hot air. I’ll start it off by putting it this way: all the negative things I said about the 86a Durians I reviewed a while back, get rid of all of those, add an absolutely buttery slide and you’ll begin to get an idea of what the 80a Stimulus wheel is like.

The wheel itself is soft enough to provide ample grip when needed, even at speed, but are still easy to break into slides and hookup with the road very easily. The offset core creates a nice, rounded lip that will last until the wheel is far through its life cycle and already close to coring, it’s this lip that allows the Stimulus to have an unreal amount of grip for your average freeride wheel, but still break out into buttery smooth slides unlike it’s square-lip cousin, the 4President (which we’ll have a review on in the coming weeks).

The 80a “Happy ‘Thane” that Orangatang developed is the other major component making this wheel so nice. While it’s soft enough to leave nice orange ‘thane lines and provide the grip you’re looking for through corners, it’s hard enough to still resist flatspotting and coning too fast. They are stone ground before getting to you, meaning they don’t have the nasty mold release you find in other wheels and greatly reduces the break-in time of the wheel. I’ve been steadily riding my Stims on my light downhill/freeride setup for the last month without any flatspotting and only a mild amount of coning, which I’ve been able to manage through rotating wheels. While at slower speeds they’re a little harder to break into slides, at speed they’re responsive and easy to go from grip to slide when you want to. They do not ice out, and provide a very buttery slide that will shave speed but still allow you to retain enough momentum to continue your run at full intensity. The soft thane also makes the wheels a pleasure to push, they’re super smooth on pavement and, thanks to their 70mm size, are able to roll over most obstacles that lie in your path and accelerate quickly.

While I’m a huge fan of these wheels overall, they have been somewhat disappointing in the cold. While we’ve been fortunate to have a rather warm winter here in the Northeast, these wheels seem to under perform when they’re cold, loosing their buttery slide and becoming much more unpredictable and even chattery. It’s been warm enough that after a few runs the wheels start acting a bit more normal, but will have to give them a try in the much colder weather we’re due to have soon. I’m most curious to see if below freezing temperatures and super cold asphalt will allow them to warm up enough, or if they’ll stay cold through an entire session — a real concern for the long winters we usually have. I’ll be post an update when I get a chance to give them a try in some much colder conditions, but it’s something that has really stood out on colder days so far.

Bottom line? I really am truly in love with these wheels. The slide is buttery smooth, predictable and hooks up with the road with ease, allowing you to shed enough speed through corners and still maintain enough momentum to finish the next slide or trick. I know I mentioned it before in brief, but the orange ‘thane lines the wheels leave, especially in warmer conditions, are absolutely steezy as well. If you’re looking for an all around wheel, this might be the perfect one. Enough grip to still go nice and fast down technical runs, a smooth and predictable slide, and soft enough urethane to feel great while riding, they are extremely versatile and will definitely remain my freeride wheel of choice for the immediate future.

Don’t forget to Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter to stay fresh on all the photos, videos, and cool tidbits we share between posts!

Video: Lauren Suchocki and Douglass Schmidt Battle Centars in Western MA

While the title isn’t true, hopefully it got your attention. Deep in the hills of Western Massachusetts we do find Lauren Suchocki and Douglass Schmidt battling a gnarly downhill run with what looks like an incredibly fun set of hairpins.

While we’ve seen some GoPro footage from Lauren and some others from this spot before, this is by far the best edit done there yet. Schmidt is once again showing his constantly progressing camera and editing skills in a quick yet fun and well done edit (they shot this just two days ago).

Since most people care, Douglass is riding a Lifelong Seeker with 176mm Surf-Rodz RKPs and 81a ABEC11 Flashbacks and Lauren is riding a Rayne Babykiller with 176mm Surf-Rodz RKPs and 80a Orangatang Stimulus wheels.

Video: East Coast Cookin’ with the Swag Shuffle

While we’re still running our give-away, where you can enter to win a set of Orangatang 80a Stimulus wheels, we figured we’d return to our regular programming and bring you a little TGIF/East Coast video steez.

Friend of the site Mike Girard sent me the final version of his edit from his time back home shredding with Norman Plante and Eric Roth over Thanksgiving. Mike posted a teaser on his Tumblr a little while back showing some absolutely steezy swaged out standies but now we’ve got the whole thing. Sure enough, as promised, Mike and his boys went hard, swaging so hard even the Based God Lil B himself would be proud.

Make sure to keep an eye on Eden Racing’s Norman Plante, he absolutely shreds, making shuv-its and big standees look toooooo easy.

Don’t forget to head over to our Facebook Page to enter the chance to win a set of 80a Stimulus wheels from Skate The East and Orangatang!

Interview: 2011 Adrennalina Tour Champion Paul Kent

With rain blasting a large part of the East right now and it being the end of Hump Day I couldn’t resist posting this for everyone to enjoy. If you’re a regular reader of the site by now you should at least know Paul from our coverage of the Adrennalina Skateboard Marathon Tour which wrapped-up on November 5th with Paul being crowned first ever Tour Champion. In addition to his Adrennalina fame most people also know Paul from his Long Treks On Skate Decks video series, the Paskapoo Downhill Rodeo, GreenSkate and eating celery at the steakhouses. You can catch up with him on www.skaterpaul.com. He is sponsored by Orangatang wheels, Rayne longboards, Royal Boardshop, Vega Sport, and rides with various other teams. I got a chance to talk to Paul via e-mail once he got back to Canada after the Adrennalina Championship for a short interview, telling how he first got into distance skating, how he felt about the last Adrennalina race, and so much more. Paul is making a big name for himself in distance skating and it’s pretty clear he’s just heating up, check out the interview below and see for yourself.

STE: Skate The East: Right now you’re living up in Calgary but mentioned to me on Twitter that you’re originally from the East. Where are you from originally and what took you out to the base of the Canadian Rockies?

Paul Kent: I am originally from Cambridge Ontario, just about 45 minutes west of Toronto. My Dad’s family is from Wabana Newfoundland, which is as east as it gets. Anyways, ten years ago the longboard scene in Cambridge consisted of myself, Marcel Robert, and about 14 other super casual carvers. I would have to drive out to Dundas to skate with Mike Civindino our (then) Canadian slalom champ, or to Toronto to ride with their small group of 10-20 odd kids serious with Downhill riding. I felt I had quickly outgrown the talent base as I wanted to learn from more experienced riders. I decided to find riders out west to learn from and I connected with the parts of Jody Willcock’s crew. (Jody is the inventor of the drop deck). I still identify with Ontario as being where I come from and I miss riding my hometown and the escarpment.

STE: In addition to being the recently crowned 1st ever Adrenalina Skateboard Marathon Champion after a stellar season you’re also well known for your incredibly long distance skateboard backpacking adventures. How did you first enter the world of distance longboarding, and what has motivated you to keep pushing and pumping after all these miles?

PK: Well first off Jeff was the first Adrenalina champ. I am the first tour champion. I failed miserably at last years Adrenalina in Hallendale. Haha. But to answer your question, I began riding to work through rain, shine, even two inch deep snow. When I was late I would have to sprint to work on my board. By the time a year had gone by I had cut my work commute in half. I had done well in a Central park race in New York, but it wasnt until the fall of 2007 that it really happened. I was invited to the push race “King of the Forest” in Vancouver by Mike Benda and Rocky. Having no money for a bus, I joked to my friends and family that maybe I should skate there. They didn’t realize I was joking and started helping me prepare. Haha. Then they agreed it was a stupid crazy idea but I was the craziest person they knew. I packed up my hiking pack with lightweight gear and I skated there. I Got to the race and took the top spot of any Canadian, however loosing to Robin (The Leg) McGuirk and Jon Huey. It was a great trip of self discovery, freezing nearly to death at the top of mountain passes and running from wild animals, skating alone in the dark in places where there are no lights. And then a great race where I saw podium. This touring and push racing thing really had captivated me.

STE: You and Jeff Vyain crossed the finish line hand-in-hand to tie the 1st Adrenalina Skateboard Marathon Championship this past weekend, what was your first thought when you finally caught up to Jeff and he suggested you share the prizes and podium?

PK: My first thought when Jeff offered to go splits was “yes, sound offer.” we both earned it, and I still felt it was anyone’s win. I had caught up to Jeff and took the lead, he then caught up to me about a half mile further and that’s when he proposed the prize split. We skated for a few seconds, then I suggested we shake on it before continuing our race against eachother. Now honestly I didn’t consider this to mean we were supposed to cross the finish together. I began surging to the finish. He and then bounced back and fourth for the lead and charged all but feet from the line. I pushed to the fastest speed I could possibly go and Jeff was still beside me. That’s when I reached for his hand. I did it without looking and he grabbed my arm. We both won, literally and figuratively.

STE: What was the general reaction by the spectators?

PK: The spectators were stoked. I think they really appreciate that we’re not easy on eachother and we pushed faster times, yet in the end it’s about camaraderie, helping eachother to grow as athletes, and being stoked for eachother.

STE: You and Jeff Vyain have arguably the most famous “rivalry” in longboarding right now. When did you guys first run into each other and how did you become “best frenemies?”

PK: Our first encounter was online. He wrote me to tell me he wanted to race me. We met in Hallendale and I wasn’t feeling optimal. He won that race, I hung out with him the rest of that night talking at him and sharing technical info with him. I’m sure he thought I was a chump, but I was stoked to have found a true nemesis. Someone to share and help me become better, by sometimes being better then me. I followed what he did online, in interviews and in his community and became certain he was a good role model and ambassador for longboarding and push race. Our next race was the Cheif Ladiga 188 mile and I won, earning Jeff’s respect. At the after party we had a great talk about our responsibility to the sport. That got us off on the same foot.

STE: How do you intend to spend the off-season this year?

PK: I read lots in the winter. Its when I learn about how to train and eat better. I will be doing more weight lifting, some cross country skiing and running. Although not so much as to over-train before the season begins. I also need to do some physiotherapy. Hopefully I’ll get to head to Cali or Van for some downhill skateboarding through the winter. And of course I’ll be back to working a real job.

STE: You’ve said you have a career goal of a 1:20:00 marathon, what other goals for longboarding in general do you have?

PK: My goals are to help the sport grow in a positive and sustainable way, to help produce some world class skaters in various genres, to create a LongTreks film, start a better bearing company, start downhilling in contests again and of course running as close to 1:20:00 as humanly possible. I’m really aiming to break 1:26:00 next year. But it will depend on the course and the weather.

STE: If you could have anything in the world, prepared by the best of the best, what would be your dream pre-race/long skate meal?

PK: My best dream pre race meal would be the best cheesecake in the world, or best in the dream world for that matter! But since I do not exist in the dream world, I’ll stick to sweet potatoes with a garnish of vegan gummy bears, Vega sport optimizer and ginger kombucha. Unfortunately the best of the bests talents would be wasted on pre-race meals as the GI tract won’t tolerate the best foods during these races. It sucks! But if the Best chefs would take a rain check, I’d be glad to have some mean Mali kofta with Lacha prantha after the race.

STE: Best of luck in the off-season, hopefully you get some deserved rest and relaxation before the grind of training starts again!

PK: Thank you very much. Rest and relaxation is in in full effect right now. But physiotherapy and trigger-point therapy begin soon, followed by weights and fitness maintenance. Say hi to the east for me. I miss her.

We’re stoked Paul took the time to talk to us and wish him the best for the off season!

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