Video: Ed Garner is a Beast

Ed Garner is an absolute beast, one of the rawest skaters out there and charges like a boss.  I skated with Ed and Dan Fontz the other weekend on their hometown skate turf and man I couldn’t keep up those dudes are gnar.  That DH run also looks 10x more gnar in person. In Maryland they skate narrow, they skate fast, and they take the only lines you can to survive out there. Driveways, paths, one lane roads, they shred it all.  Ed gets hooked up by Rayne and Volante, so props to those dudes supporting out here. Enough said, check out this video if you haven’t already seen it.

-Henry

Video: Ed Garner does his thing

Ed Garner, reppin’ Team Doggied-Out, kills it on his double kick in his new video. Ed’s got some sick style, pushing it a little bit out of his comfort zone and thats dope. You can tell that Ed is hustlin’ his skating faster and is really skating at the top of his ability. This kind of shit gets me stoked, a fellow Eastcoaster doing shit the way he wants to do it and not taking crap from nobody. Respect. Check his video out, you won’t regret it..

– Connor

Rider Profile: Henry Goguen

One of the main reasons I started Skate The East was to shine a light on East Coast skaters and give them a little more exposure. While I’ve been able to do that a little through posting dank videos from East Coast riders, I’ve been wanting to step it up a little more for some time now. One thing that’s been kicking around in the back of my mind has been the idea of doing rider profiles: short clips that introduce you to a new shredder who you might not have heard of yet, show you a little of what they got, and show people that the East Coast has some real rippers indeed. Well folks, here’s our first one.

Henry Goguen is from Washington, D.C. originally but currently calls UMASS Amherst his home. He’s a perfect example of an East Coast all-around shredder who just wants to go out, throw down, and have fun and we’re honored to have him be our first Rider Profile. Keep your eyes peeled because we think you’ll start to see Henry in a lot more places as the season goes on.

Video: SZ Playday

If you’re following along with our Facebook Page (which you should be by now) you’ll remember that I posted an update earlier saying that we had perfect conditions up here in New England and were off to take downhill runs and footage, an endeavor that proved very successful.After our visit to the Surf-Rodz shop this past week Lauren and I were super stoked about everything Wayne and his crew are doing and called our good friend Henry in for a good ole Surf-Rodz downhill session. Just like I promised I got right to work on editing when I got home and cranked out a fun little downhill video featuring Lauren Suchocki, Henry Lancaster-Goguen, and myself.

Setups:

Henry: Eden Racing Maple Sparrow w/ ABEC 11 75mm Big Zigs on 10mm 45* Surf-Rodz RKPs
Mike: TR Custom Longboards Blitz w/ Orangatang  70mm 80a 4Presidents on 10mm 45* Surf-Rodz RKPs
Lauren: Rayne Baby Killer w/ Orangatang  70mm 80a 4Presidents on 8mm 45* Surf-Rodz RKPs

Interview: 2011 Adrennalina Tour Champion Paul Kent

With rain blasting a large part of the East right now and it being the end of Hump Day I couldn’t resist posting this for everyone to enjoy. If you’re a regular reader of the site by now you should at least know Paul from our coverage of the Adrennalina Skateboard Marathon Tour which wrapped-up on November 5th with Paul being crowned first ever Tour Champion. In addition to his Adrennalina fame most people also know Paul from his Long Treks On Skate Decks video series, the Paskapoo Downhill Rodeo, GreenSkate and eating celery at the steakhouses. You can catch up with him on www.skaterpaul.com. He is sponsored by Orangatang wheels, Rayne longboards, Royal Boardshop, Vega Sport, and rides with various other teams. I got a chance to talk to Paul via e-mail once he got back to Canada after the Adrennalina Championship for a short interview, telling how he first got into distance skating, how he felt about the last Adrennalina race, and so much more. Paul is making a big name for himself in distance skating and it’s pretty clear he’s just heating up, check out the interview below and see for yourself.

STE: Skate The East: Right now you’re living up in Calgary but mentioned to me on Twitter that you’re originally from the East. Where are you from originally and what took you out to the base of the Canadian Rockies?

Paul Kent: I am originally from Cambridge Ontario, just about 45 minutes west of Toronto. My Dad’s family is from Wabana Newfoundland, which is as east as it gets. Anyways, ten years ago the longboard scene in Cambridge consisted of myself, Marcel Robert, and about 14 other super casual carvers. I would have to drive out to Dundas to skate with Mike Civindino our (then) Canadian slalom champ, or to Toronto to ride with their small group of 10-20 odd kids serious with Downhill riding. I felt I had quickly outgrown the talent base as I wanted to learn from more experienced riders. I decided to find riders out west to learn from and I connected with the parts of Jody Willcock’s crew. (Jody is the inventor of the drop deck). I still identify with Ontario as being where I come from and I miss riding my hometown and the escarpment.

STE: In addition to being the recently crowned 1st ever Adrenalina Skateboard Marathon Champion after a stellar season you’re also well known for your incredibly long distance skateboard backpacking adventures. How did you first enter the world of distance longboarding, and what has motivated you to keep pushing and pumping after all these miles?

PK: Well first off Jeff was the first Adrenalina champ. I am the first tour champion. I failed miserably at last years Adrenalina in Hallendale. Haha. But to answer your question, I began riding to work through rain, shine, even two inch deep snow. When I was late I would have to sprint to work on my board. By the time a year had gone by I had cut my work commute in half. I had done well in a Central park race in New York, but it wasnt until the fall of 2007 that it really happened. I was invited to the push race “King of the Forest” in Vancouver by Mike Benda and Rocky. Having no money for a bus, I joked to my friends and family that maybe I should skate there. They didn’t realize I was joking and started helping me prepare. Haha. Then they agreed it was a stupid crazy idea but I was the craziest person they knew. I packed up my hiking pack with lightweight gear and I skated there. I Got to the race and took the top spot of any Canadian, however loosing to Robin (The Leg) McGuirk and Jon Huey. It was a great trip of self discovery, freezing nearly to death at the top of mountain passes and running from wild animals, skating alone in the dark in places where there are no lights. And then a great race where I saw podium. This touring and push racing thing really had captivated me.

STE: You and Jeff Vyain crossed the finish line hand-in-hand to tie the 1st Adrenalina Skateboard Marathon Championship this past weekend, what was your first thought when you finally caught up to Jeff and he suggested you share the prizes and podium?

PK: My first thought when Jeff offered to go splits was “yes, sound offer.” we both earned it, and I still felt it was anyone’s win. I had caught up to Jeff and took the lead, he then caught up to me about a half mile further and that’s when he proposed the prize split. We skated for a few seconds, then I suggested we shake on it before continuing our race against eachother. Now honestly I didn’t consider this to mean we were supposed to cross the finish together. I began surging to the finish. He and then bounced back and fourth for the lead and charged all but feet from the line. I pushed to the fastest speed I could possibly go and Jeff was still beside me. That’s when I reached for his hand. I did it without looking and he grabbed my arm. We both won, literally and figuratively.

STE: What was the general reaction by the spectators?

PK: The spectators were stoked. I think they really appreciate that we’re not easy on eachother and we pushed faster times, yet in the end it’s about camaraderie, helping eachother to grow as athletes, and being stoked for eachother.

STE: You and Jeff Vyain have arguably the most famous “rivalry” in longboarding right now. When did you guys first run into each other and how did you become “best frenemies?”

PK: Our first encounter was online. He wrote me to tell me he wanted to race me. We met in Hallendale and I wasn’t feeling optimal. He won that race, I hung out with him the rest of that night talking at him and sharing technical info with him. I’m sure he thought I was a chump, but I was stoked to have found a true nemesis. Someone to share and help me become better, by sometimes being better then me. I followed what he did online, in interviews and in his community and became certain he was a good role model and ambassador for longboarding and push race. Our next race was the Cheif Ladiga 188 mile and I won, earning Jeff’s respect. At the after party we had a great talk about our responsibility to the sport. That got us off on the same foot.

STE: How do you intend to spend the off-season this year?

PK: I read lots in the winter. Its when I learn about how to train and eat better. I will be doing more weight lifting, some cross country skiing and running. Although not so much as to over-train before the season begins. I also need to do some physiotherapy. Hopefully I’ll get to head to Cali or Van for some downhill skateboarding through the winter. And of course I’ll be back to working a real job.

STE: You’ve said you have a career goal of a 1:20:00 marathon, what other goals for longboarding in general do you have?

PK: My goals are to help the sport grow in a positive and sustainable way, to help produce some world class skaters in various genres, to create a LongTreks film, start a better bearing company, start downhilling in contests again and of course running as close to 1:20:00 as humanly possible. I’m really aiming to break 1:26:00 next year. But it will depend on the course and the weather.

STE: If you could have anything in the world, prepared by the best of the best, what would be your dream pre-race/long skate meal?

PK: My best dream pre race meal would be the best cheesecake in the world, or best in the dream world for that matter! But since I do not exist in the dream world, I’ll stick to sweet potatoes with a garnish of vegan gummy bears, Vega sport optimizer and ginger kombucha. Unfortunately the best of the bests talents would be wasted on pre-race meals as the GI tract won’t tolerate the best foods during these races. It sucks! But if the Best chefs would take a rain check, I’d be glad to have some mean Mali kofta with Lacha prantha after the race.

STE: Best of luck in the off-season, hopefully you get some deserved rest and relaxation before the grind of training starts again!

PK: Thank you very much. Rest and relaxation is in in full effect right now. But physiotherapy and trigger-point therapy begin soon, followed by weights and fitness maintenance. Say hi to the east for me. I miss her.

We’re stoked Paul took the time to talk to us and wish him the best for the off season!

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